Refreshing ANZSCO

Refreshing ANZSCO Angela Ball Wed, 08/19/2020 - 15:16
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Refreshing ANZSCO

Occupations in this cluster are jobs that are popular in industry, but not yet reflected in ANZSCO.

Fundraisers

Fundraisers Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 09:38

Fundraisers organise activities to raise funds or otherwise solicit and gather monetary donations or other gifts for an organisation. They may design and produce promotional materials and raise awareness of the organisation's work, goals, and financial needs. Fundraisers have been around for some time, however demand for this occupation is increasing, and the role is significantly different from existing occupations in ANZSCO. 

Main tasks

Fundraisers' main tasks include planning and organising events to raise funds, applying and writing grant applications, communicating and managing relationships with donors, and setting strategy and goals for future fundraising and marketing.

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

75%
of people employed as are female.
38 hours
is the average working hours  per week for .
70%
of people working as  are employed  full-time.
41
years old is the  average age for people working as .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications. 

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.

Researchers

Researchers Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 09:51

Researchers perform research, independently as a principal investigator. They further the search for knowledge through systematic investigation to establish facts. Researchers can work in academic, industrial, government, or private institutions.  Researchers have been around for some time, however demand for this occupation is increasing, and the role is significantly different from existing occupations in ANZSCO. 

Main tasks

Researchers' main tasks include conducting and managing research projects, analysing data and writing research papers. Researchers also supervise students, and conduct experiments.

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

49%
of people employed as are female.
39 hours
is the average working hours per week for .
76%
of are employed full-time.
41
years old is the average age for .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications. 

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.

Research Assistants

Research Assistants Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 09:45

Research Assistants are employed by universities, research institutes or private organisations to assist in academic or private research. Research Assistants support social scientists conduct laboratory, survey, and other research. They may help prepare findings for publication and assist in laboratory analysis, quality control, or data management. Research Assistants are not independent and report to a supervisor or principal investigator. Research Assistants have been around for some time, however demand for this occupation is increasing, and the role is significantly different from existing occupations in ANZSCO. 

Main tasks

Research Assistants' main tasks include assisting with collecting and analysing data, setting up lab and field work, conducting surveys, research, experiments, and writing reports.

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

64%
of people employed as are female.
39 hours
is the average working hours per week for .
43%
of are employed full-time.
34
years old is the average age for .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications. 

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.