Regulatory

Regulatory Angela Ball Wed, 08/19/2020 - 15:16

 

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Occupations in this cluster reflect a changing regulatory landscape, especially in financial services and energy industries.

Risk Analysts

Risk Analysts Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 10:51

Risk Analysts identify and review potential risk areas threatening the assets or capital of organisations. They may specialise in either credit, market, operational or regulatory risk analysis. They use statistical analysis to evaluate risk, make recommendations to reduce and control risk and review documentation for legal compliance.

Main Tasks

Risk Analysts' main tasks include credit and capital risk analysis, statistical modelling of corporate risks, providing risk management advice and supporting compliance activities.

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

42%
of people employed as are female.
37 hours
is the average working hours per week for .
95%
of are employed full-time.
36
years old is the average age for .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications. 

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.

Regulatory Affairs Specialists

Regulatory Affairs Specialists Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 10:45

Regulatory Affairs Specialists manage regulatory and legal matters in several sectors such as the healthcare, energy and banking industries. They oversee the development of products and services from inception to market release and ensure compliance with local legislation and regulatory requirements. They have experience in the different phases of regulatory processes and act as an interface between businesses and government officials or regulatory boards.

Main Tasks

Regulatory Affairs Specialists' main tasks include liaising with corporate staff and regulatory bodies, preparing submissions for regulatory authorities, interpreting and advising on legislation, and ensuring compliance with regulation. 

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

61%
of people employed as are female.
38 hours
is the average working hours per week for .
80%
of are employed full-time.
45
years old is the average age for .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications.

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.

Energy Auditors

Energy Auditors Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 10:27

Energy Auditors conduct energy audits of buildings, building systems, or process systems. They may also conduct investment grade audits of buildings or systems.

Main Tasks

Energy Auditors' main tasks include conducting household energy audits, advising companies on energy use and energy efficiency, and performing statistical analysis on energy data.

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

33%
of people employed as are female.
45 hours
is the average working hours per week for .
75%
of are employed full-time.
45
years old is the average age for .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications. 

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.

Compensation and Benefits Analysts

Compensation and Benefits Analysts Jon Wundersitz Thu, 08/20/2020 - 10:18

Compensation and Benefits Analysts conduct analysis of job compensation and benefits for employers. They may specialise in areas such as position classification or pension programs.

Main Tasks

Compensation and Benefit Analysts' main tasks include organising and presenting human resource related materials on matters such as salary packaging or pension plans, and advising and managing workers' compensation claims.

This graph shows the number of persons employed in this occupation from 2015 to 2019.

This chart includes two measures of average (median and mean) weekly wage for this occupation, as well as the 25th and 75th percentile. These latter two figures represent the wages that the top 75 per cent and the top 25 per cent of employees can expect to earn equal to or more than, respectively.

87%
of people employed as are female.
37 hours
is the average working hours per week for .
86%
of are employed full-time.
46
years old is the average age for .

Date source: ABS Labour Force Survey microdata, NSC Analysis.

This infographic shows the demographic characteristics of persons employed in this occupation. It shows the average age of all workers, the average hours worked per week, the percentage that work full time, and the percentage of the workforce that is female. 

This chart shows the proportion of workers employed in this occupation by their highest qualification level. As these are emerging occupations, the links between qualification level and employment are not always clear cut, explaining why some occupations have a mix of employees with higher education qualifications and some employees have no post-school qualifications. 

These skills are those most frequently mentioned in Australian job advertisements for this occupation – they do not represent the full set of skills or qualifications required to undertake this role, or the most important skills. Sometimes, skills that are critical to perform a role are not expressed in a job ad as they are considered common knowledge, or a qualification is used as a proxy for these skills.