Jobs by Occupation

Jobs by Occupation Jon Wundersitz Mon, 11/23/2020 - 13:41

Managers. 1 in 4 are aged 55 years or old and the top employing occupations are Retail Managers, Advertising, Publication Relations and Sales Managers and Construction Managers.

Professionals. 3 out of 4 hold a bachelor degree or higher qualification and the top employing occupations are Registered Nurses, Accountants and Primary School Teachers.

Technicians and Trades Workers. 84% are employed full-time and the top employing occupations are Electricians, Metal Fitters and Machinists and Carpenters and Joiners.

Community and Personal Service Workers. More than 40% are employed in Health Care and Social Assistance and the top employing occupations are Aged and Disabled Carers, Child Carers and Education Aides.

Clerical and Administrative Workers. Almost 3 in 4 workers identify as female and the top employing occupations are General Clerks, Receptionists and Accounting Clerks.

Sales Workers. 38% are aged 15 to 24 years and the top employing occupations are General Sales Assistants, Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers and Real Estate Sales Agents.

Machinery Operators and Drivers. 81% are employed full-time and the top employing occupations are Truck Drivers, Storepersons and Delivery Drivers.

Labourers. Around 60% do not hold post-school qualifications and the top employing occupations are Commercial Cleaners, Kitchenhands and Building and Plumbing Labourers.

Managers

Managers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:43

The Managers graphic shows 32% of jobs are regional. 4% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 32% of workers are self-employed.

The Managers graphic shows 38% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

A large number of Australians are employed as Managers and they work in many different types of organisations across all industries.

Are qualifications or experience needed?

This is a relatively skilled group, as Managers generally hold senior positions, taking responsibility for staff and operations. This means qualifications are usually needed, however, sometimes significant on-the-job experience is sufficient.

  • The majority of Managers hold post-school qualifications, although this is less common for Farmers and Farm Managers and Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers.
  • The need for workplace experience is reflected in the age profile of the workforce. Half of all Managers are aged 45 years or older. Just 4% are aged 15 to 24 years, although there are more opportunities for young people in Hospitality, Retail and Service Manager roles (accounting for 8% of this group).

Managers are typically skilled in communication and building relationships, planning, budgeting and problem solving.

Top Employing Occupations

Occupation
Retail Managers
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers
Construction Managers
Livestock Farmers
Human Resource Managers
Other Specialist Managers
Finance Managers
ICT Managers
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers
Production Managers
Cafe and Restaurant Managers
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers
Crop Farmers
General Managers
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmers
Chief Executives and Managing Directors
Conference and Event Organisers
Policy and Planning Managers
Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers
Health and Welfare Services Managers

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In which industries do Managers work?

Managers work in every industry, but the largest shares are in Retail Trade and Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (both 12%). Other major employing industries include Accommodation and Food Services (9%) and Manufacturing (9%).

Some Manager occupations are concentrated in specific industries. For example, Café and Restaurant Managers are mainly employed in Accommodation and Food Services. For other Manager occupations, such as General Managers and Human Resource Managers, employment is spread across all industries.

Are there job opportunities?

When looking for Manager vacancies, remember they are not always advertised online. Some positions are filled by the promotion of existing workers, while others are advertised in less formal ways such as word of mouth or head hunting. It is important for job seekers who are looking for Manager positions to remember this and use professional networks to help bolster their recruitment chances.

Will there be future opportunities?

Managers often perform a range of non-routine, cognitive duties (such as problem solving) so this occupation group is less susceptible to automation.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Managers

  Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile
  Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Occupation subgroup % % % % % % %
Chief Executives, General Managers and Legislators 11 27 0 30 54 27 12
Farmers and Farm Managers 20 29 4 54 19 29 46
Specialist Managers 10 36 2 21 50 28 19
Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 17 48 8 21 24 35 35
All Managers 14 38 4 25 38 30 27

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data).

Professionals

Professionals Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:46

The Professionals graphic shows 23% of jobs are regional. 7% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 15% of workers are self-employed.

The Professionals graphic shows 75% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 14% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification.3 % of workers hold an other qualification. 8% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Professionals is the largest employing occupation group in Australia (accounting for around one in four workers).

There are clear differences in the representation of men and women across occupations in the Professionals group. Around 74% of Health Professionals and 72% of Education Professionals are female, but 79% of ICT Professionals are male. The extent of part-time employment also varies, being relatively rare for ICT Professionals but more common for Health Professionals, Arts and Media Professionals, and Education Professionals.

In which industries do Professionals work?

Around two thirds of Professionals are employed in just three industries.

  • Health Care and Social Assistance (24% of Professional employment).
  • Education and Training (21%).
  • Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (21%).

Are qualifications needed?

Most Professional jobs require a bachelor degree or higher qualification (75% of Professionals have this level of qualification), with university study the main pathway for employment. Reflecting the time it takes to gain relevant qualifications, a relatively small proportion of Professionals is aged 15 to 24 years.

In addition to qualifications, skills that are often required to be a Professional include communication, planning, project management, problem solving, writing and research.

Top employing occupations

Occupation
Registered Nurses
Accountants
Primary School Teachers
Software and Applications Programmers
Secondary School Teachers
Advertising and Marketing Professionals
Solicitors
Management and Organisation Analysts
University Lecturers and Tutors
Civil Engineering Professionals
General Practitioners and Resident Medical Officers
Human Resource Professionals
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers
Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists
Computer Network Professionals
Private Tutors and Teachers
Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers
Vocational Education Teachers

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Are there job opportunities?

There will continue to be job opportunities for Professionals. Along with the rising demand for these workers, however, the supply of university educated Australians is also increasing, with higher education enrolments increasing significantly over the past decade. With more university graduates, and more people searching for work, there are now large numbers of qualified applicants competing for some Professional occupations.

With increased competition, job seekers are encouraged to be as flexible as possible with their availability and highlight their transferable skills and experience. Employers will be looking for reliable and flexible workers, with good communication skills who can learn new tasks quickly and adapt to new working environments. If you can, give examples from your work history which highlight these skills and make you stand out from the crowd.

Will there be future opportunities?

Professionals perform analytical, conceptual and creative tasks which are less susceptible to technological automation.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Professionals

  Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile
Occupation subgroup Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region % % % % % % %
Arts and Media Professionals 37 52 11 18 52 21 23
Business, Human Resource and Marketing Professionals 19 51 6 16 69 16 12
Design, Engineering, Science and Transport Professionals 16 31 8 14 74 15 8
Education Professionals 34 72 8 20 84 10 4
Health Professionals 38 74 6 20 80 14 3
ICT Professionals 9 21 5 12 69 13 11
Legal, Social and Welfare Professionals 29 67 4 22 78 16 5
All Professionals 26 55 7 17 75 14 8

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data).

Technicians and Trades Workers

Technicians and Trades Workers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:48

The Technicians and Trades Workers graphic shows 35% of jobs are regional. 16% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 25% of workers are self-employed.

The Technicians and Trades Workers graphic shows 11% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 57% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Technicians and Trades Workers undertake a variety of skilled manual tasks. They apply technical, trade or industry specific knowledge in construction, manufacturing, scientific, engineering and other activities.

Regional employment is fairly common with more than a third of workers employed across regional Australia. A relatively large proportion of this group are self-employed (25%), particularly Construction Trades Workers (47%), and full-time work is common.

Technicians and Trades Workers has the second lowest percentage of female workers of any occupation group (16%). This is especially apparent for Automotive and Engineering Trades Workers, Construction Trades Workers, and Electrotechnology and Telecommunications Trades Workers. That said, some occupations have large shares of female workers, such as Veterinary Nurses (97%) and Hairdressers (85%).

What qualifications and skills are needed?

Almost 60% of Technicians and Trades Workers hold a certificate III or higher vocational qualification, with apprenticeships and traineeships providing a key training pathway for many occupations in this group.

Common skills that are needed include general employability skills (such as communication, planning and problem solving) that are valued across most occupations.

Top employing occupations

Occupation
Electricians
Metal Fitters and Machinists
Carpenters and Joiners
Plumbers
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers
Motor Mechanics
Chefs
Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians
Gardeners
ICT Support Technicians
Hairdressers
Painting Trades Workers
Cooks
Medical Technicians
Plasterers
Other Building and Engineering Technicians
Electronics Trades Workers
Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics
Bakers and Pastrycooks
Telecommunications Trades Workers

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In which industries are Technicians and Trades Workers employed?

Construction accounts for the largest share of these workers (33%), followed by Manufacturing (14%) and Other Services (which includes automotive repair and maintenance) (13%).

Are there job opportunities?

With federal and state governments introducing or bringing forward infrastructure projects, and the new HomeBuilder program supporting jobs in the residential construction sector, these will help the Construction industry (and therefore Technicians and Trades Workers) remain an important source of jobs for Australians now and into the future.

Many vacancies for Technicians and Trades Workers can be advertised informally. When seeking work, it pays to be proactive by approaching employers directly (e.g. by email or by phone), checking social media, including jobs groups on social media platforms and reaching out through your network of family and friends.

Will there be future opportunities?

The tasks performed in this group are diverse. Some are routine, manual tasks which may be at risk of automation, although many occupations involve non-routine or unpredictable duties which are more difficult to automate.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Technicians and Trades Workers

  Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile
Occupation subgroup Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region % % % % % % %
Engineering, ICT and Science Technicians 15 26 6 18 31 45 18
Automotive and Engineering Trades Workers 6 1 17 17 5 67 22
Construction Trades Workers 12 1 21 13 4 61 33
Electrotechnology and Telecommunications Trades Workers 8 2 19 14 7 64 24
Food Trades Workers 29 32 16 14 13 49 34
Skilled Animal and Horticultural Workers 34 36 17 22 11 39 42
Other Technicians and Trades Workers 31 45 13 18 10 58 27
All Technicians and Trades Workers 16 16 16 16 11 57 27

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, A snapshot in time: The Australian labour market and COVID-19; National Skills Commission, Employers' Recruitment Insights.

Community and Personal Service Workers

Community and Personal Service Workers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:52

The Community and Personal Service Workers graphic shows 34% of jobs are regional. 23% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 9% of workers are self-employed.

The Community and Personal Service Workers graphic shows 21% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 41% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 32% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Community and Personal Service Workers provide a wide range of services, including in the areas of aged and disability care, health and social welfare, child care, hospitality, policing, tourism and sports. Employment is largely concentrated in two industries, with 41% employed in Health Care and Social Assistance and 18% in Accommodation and Food Services.

Workers are mainly female (70%) and part-time employment is common (55%), although there are differences by subgroup. For example, Protective Service Workers (which includes Police, Fire and Emergency Workers and Security Officers and Guards) is largely a male workforce (76%) and has a relatively low level of part-time employment (15%).

Are qualifications needed?

Entry pathways are varied, reflecting the diverse range of services provided by workers in this group. Around 41% of workers have a certificate III or higher vocational qualification, 32% do not hold a post-school qualification and 21% have a bachelor degree or higher.

Health and Welfare Support Workers (which includes Ambulance Officers and Paramedics and Dental Hygienists, Technicians and Therapists) is the most highly educated subgroup, with 88% holding post-school qualifications.

Top employing occupations

Occupation
Aged and Disabled Carers
Child Carers
Education Aides
Waiters
Bar Attendants and Baristas
Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers
Police
Security Officers and Guards
Welfare Support Workers
Cafe Workers
Beauty Therapists
Prison Officers
Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials
Fitness Instructors
Dental Assistants
Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses
Massage Therapists
Ambulance Officers and Paramedics
Tourism and Travel Advisers
Fire and Emergency Workers

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Are there job opportunities?

Some occupations in this group provide good entry level employment opportunities. For example, young workers (aged 15 to 24 years) account for 55% of Hospitality Workers and post-school study is often not needed for these jobs. For jobs within the health care sector, check online recruitment websites as they are regularly used by employers. It is important that you also remember to check the websites of big employers, as many will only advertise jobs on their own websites.

Will there be future opportunities?

Jobs in this group typically require skills that are less likely to be automated with technology (such as interpersonal and communication skills). A significant share of the workers in this occupation group are employed in Health Care and Social Assistance and future demand is expected to be driven by population growth, an ageing population and the continued expansion of the National Disability Insurance Scheme.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Community and Personal Service Workers

  Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile
Occupation subgroup Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region % % % % % % %
Health and Welfare Support Workers 42 72 8 23 30 55 12
Carers and Aides 61 84 16 21 20 52 23
Hospitality Workers 73 70 55 6 19 18 58
Protective Service Workers 15 24 9 16 21 44 26
Sports and Personal Service Workers 57 66 23 14 20 38 35
All Community and Personal Service Workers1 55 70 23 17 21 41 32

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Survey of Employers' Recruitment Experiences; Victorian Council of Social Services; Supporting Australia’s future community services workforce.

Clerical and Administrative Workers

Clerical and Administrative Workers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:53

The Clerical and Administrative Workers graphic shows 28% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 13% of workers are self-employed.

The Clerical and Administrative Workers graphic shows 27% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 37% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Clerical and Administrative Workers provide support to businesses by organising, storing, manipulating and retrieving information. Employment is spread widely across industries but most jobs are likely to be office-based.

Top employing occupations

Occupation
General Clerks
Receptionists
Accounting Clerks
Contract, Program and Project Administrators
Office Managers
Bookkeepers
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks
Information Officers
Keyboard Operators
Bank Workers
Personal Assistants
Couriers and Postal Deliverers
Payroll Clerks
Inspectors and Regulatory Officers
Transport and Despatch Clerks
Insurance, Money Market and Statistical Clerks
Call or Contact Centre Workers
Secretaries
Credit and Loans Officers
Practice Managers

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There are opportunities in this group for workers who do not hold post-school qualifications, with more than a third of this group not having completed further study. Around one in five Inquiry Clerks and Receptionists are aged 15 to 24 years old, indicating this occupation is suited for job seekers looking for entry level positions.

This workforce is mainly female, with women accounting for 73% of these workers. Within this group, though, there is some variation, with women making up 95% of Personal Assistants and Secretaries but only 33% of Clerical and Office Support Workers.

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers' Recruitment Insights.

Sales Workers

Sales Workers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:56

The Sales Workers graphic shows 31% of jobs are regional. 38% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 9% of workers are self-employed.

The Sales Workers graphic shows 17% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher.21 % of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 56% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Sales Workers sell goods, services and property, and provide sales support. A large share of these workers are employed in Retail Trade (60%).

Few jobs in this group require post-school qualifications and the workforce is relatively young (38% are aged 15 to 24 years).

Top employing occupations

Occupation
General Sales Assistants
Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers
Real Estate Sales Agents
Sales Representatives
Retail Supervisors
Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons
Pharmacy Sales Assistants
Insurance Agents
Service Station Attendants
Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons
ICT Sales Assistants
Ticket Salespersons
Telemarketers
Models and Sales Demonstrators
Auctioneers, and Stock and Station Agents
Retail and Wool Buyers
Street Vendors and Related Salespersons
Visual Merchandisers
Other Sales Support Workers

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These are often people’s first jobs and seven day a week trading hours for many retail stores creates part-time employment opportunities for students (57% of jobs are part-time).

Jobs are often advertised through informal methods, while some vacancies are filled through applicants approaching employers for work. Research by the NSC indicates that around 33% of employers advertise by word of mouth, 14% use social media and 12% are approached directly by a job seeker.

Self-employment is relatively rare, with around 9% of workers self-employed.

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers' Recruitment Insights.

Machinery Operators and Drivers

Machinery Operators and Drivers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 14:58

The Machinery Operators and Drivers graphic shows 36% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 14% of workers are self-employed.

The Machinery Operators and Drivers graphic shows 10% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 54% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Machinery Operators and Drivers operate machines and vehicles and are mainly employed in Transport, Postal and Warehousing, Manufacturing and Construction. More than one third of workers in this group are employed in regional Australia.

Top employing occupations

Occupation
Truck Drivers
Storepersons
Delivery Drivers
Forklift Drivers
Drillers, Miners and Shot Firers
Automobile Drivers
Earthmoving Plant Operators
Bus and Coach Drivers
Train and Tram Drivers
Other Machine Operators
Engineering Production Workers
Other Stationary Plant Operators
Crane, Hoist and Lift Operators
Agricultural, Forestry and Horticultural Plant Operators
Paper and Wood Processing Machine Operators
Sewing Machinists
Plastics and Rubber Production Machine Operators
Other Mobile Plant Operators
Industrial Spraypainters
Clay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Processing Machine Operators

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Post-school qualifications are often not essential to gain employment in this group, but tickets or licences are mandatory for many positions. Employers value employability skills such as communication, teamwork, problem solving, creativity and initiative.

This occupation group is mostly male (89% of the workforce) and the age profile is relatively old (more than one in four workers is aged 55 years or older).

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers' Recruitment Insights.

Labourers

Labourers Jon Wundersitz Wed, 11/04/2020 - 15:04

The Labourers graphic shows 40% of jobs are regional. 25% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 15% of workers are self-employed.

The Labourers graphic shows 10% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 25% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 58% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

Labourers perform a variety of routine and repetitive physical tasks. Some Labourer jobs require physical fitness (like Building and Plumbing Labourers) but not all involve heavy work (for example, Fast Food Cooks).

Jobs in this group are often advertised informally, with many being filled by applicants approaching the employer directly.

Top employing occupations

Occupation
Commercial Cleaners
Kitchenhands
Building and Plumbing Labourers
Shelf Fillers
Packers
Other Miscellaneous Labourers
Fast Food Cooks
Handypersons
Food and Drink Factory Workers
Livestock Farm Workers
Concreters
Crop Farm Workers
Domestic Cleaners
Product Assemblers
Insulation and Home Improvement Installers
Garden and Nursery Labourers
Structural Steel Construction Workers
Car Detailers
Housekeepers
Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters

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Most Labourer positions do not generally require post-school qualifications, a large share of workers are aged 15 to 24 years and part-time work is common. Accordingly, there are good opportunities for young people to gain work experience or combine work with study.

While formal qualifications are not necessarily a requirement for these roles, some may require mandatory tickets or licences. In addition, job seekers will generally need to possess a driver's licence and their own personal transport.

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers' Recruitment Insights.