Australian Jobs Report

Australian Jobs Report Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 13:15

Welcome to the 2021 edition of Australian Jobs. This publication provides an overview of trends in the Australian labour market to support job seekers and employment service providers, career advisers, those considering future training and people interested in labour market issues.

How to use Australian Jobs

Australian Jobs 2021 is designed to step you through all aspects of the labour market. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the labour market and there is now more competition for certain jobs. Accordingly, it is more important than ever to understand what employers are looking for and to gain an understanding of the labour market that you are moving into.

The publication opens with an overview of Australia’s diverse labour markets. The story of COVID-19, its impact on the labour market, and the subsequent economic recovery is detailed for each state and territory. Comprehensive analysis outlining employment opportunities across industries and occupations is also provided.

The second half of the publication provides a step-by-step process on how to find a job. From where vacancies are located, to what employers are looking for, demonstrating how formal education can help you achieve career goals and outlining what government programs are available to assist you.

There are also several pages from the National Careers Institute (NCI). The NCI was established to ensure people have access to authoritative and accurate careers information and support, irrespective of their age or career stage. You can read about the various products and services available to be connected to further education, training or work options to support your career needs or goals.

It is important to remember that the labour market can change quickly. It isn’t easy to forecast future labour market conditions and it isn’t recommended to base employment and training decisions solely on predicted shortages. It is far better to train in an area in which you have an interest and aptitude than choosing a career solely based on expectations about future conditions.

Sometimes, though, while occupations can be in high demand, job seekers can still face significant competition for positions. Conversely, employers sometimes have difficulty recruiting for occupations which have limited growth or are in decline.

More detailed information is available

Websites that offer additional information include:

There is a range of Government assistance available to help you get workplace experience, gain skills through education and training, and find the right job. More information about the assistance available is provided on the Department of Education, Skills and Employment’s website at dese.gov.au.

Inquiries about Australian Jobs should be directed to AustralianJobs@skillscommission.gov.au.

The contents of Australian Jobs 2021 is based on information available at the time of publication. Over time, the reliability of the data and analysis may diminish. The Commonwealth, its officers, employees and agents do not accept responsibility for any inaccuracies contained in the report or for any negligence in the compilation of the report and disclaim liability for any loss suffered by any person arising from the use of this report. Labour market information must be used cautiously as employment prospects can change over time and vary by region. It is important in making and assessing career choices to consider all factors, including interest and aptitudes, remuneration and expectations, and the requirements of occupations.

Response to COVID-19

Response to COVID-19 Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 13:31

The impact of COVID-19 on the labour market

The COVID-19 pandemic initially had a significant, negative impact on the Australian labour market, with employment falling much more quickly and dramatically than in previous recessions. Between March 2020 (when Australia recorded its 100th COVID-19 case) and the trough in the labour market in May 2020, the number of people employed in Australia fell by 856,900 (or 6.6%). Many businesses also reduced the hours of their workers as an early response to the pandemic, with monthly hours worked falling by 157.2 million hours (or 8.9%) between March and May 2020.

The shutdown of non-essential services, closure of schools and introduction of trading restrictions initially had a particularly large impact on employment in service industries, such as Accommodation and Food Services, Education and Training and Arts and Recreation Services. Reflecting the composition of employment in these industries, among other factors, part-time employment decreased by 535,600 (or 13.0%), between March and May 2020, while full-time employment declined by 321,300 (or 3.6%). Women, who tend to be concentrated in the above industries, were also disproportionately affected, with employment falling sharply, by 476,400 (or 7.7%), compared with a somewhat less pronounced fall of 380,500 (or 5.6%) recorded for males.

Rising COVID-19 cases and associated restrictions during this period also resulted in 663,900 people leaving the labour force between March and May 2020, pushing the participation rate down, from 65.9% in March 2020, to 62.6% in May 2020. The decrease in the participation rate was stronger for females (down by 3.7 percentage points) than males (down by 2.7 percentage points), reflecting the greater tendency of women to take on caring roles during school and childcare closures.

The unemployment rate rose from 5.3% in March 2020, to 7.0% in May 2020, significantly above the peak recorded after the Global Financial Crisis, although it would have drifted much higher if it weren’t for the large fall in labour force participation and the introduction of JobKeeper.

While the decline in employment following the onset of COVID-19 was sharp, the labour market subsequently rebounded quickly, as a result of the significant decline in coronavirus cases and an associated easing of restrictions in most jurisdictions, at the time.

Change in employment since start of downturn (%)

Changes in employment since start of downturn (%)
Number of months since start of downturn 80s recession 90s recession GFC COVID-19
0 0 0 0 0
1 -0.5 -0.4 0.1 -4.6
2 -0.7 -0.7 0 -6.6
3 -0.5 -0.9 0.1 -4.8
4 0.1 -1.1 0.1 -4
5 -0.1 -1.1 0.2 -2.8
6 -0.2 -1.9 -0.1 -3.2
7 -0.1 -1.8 0.1 -1.9
8 -0.4 -2.5 0 -1.3
9 -0.6 -2.6 -0.2 -1
10 -0.6 -2.6 0.2 -0.8
11 -0.7 -3 0.1 -0.2
12 -0.9 -3.4 0.3 0.4
13 -0.9 -3.3 0.4 0.1
14 -1.8 -3.2 0.7 1
15 -2.5 -3.6 1 1.2
16 -2.6 -3.8 1.5 1.2
17 -2.6 -3.6 1.3
18 -3.1 -3.4 1.4
19 -3.5 -3.1 1.5
20 -3 -3.4 1.5
21 -2.9 -3.5 2
22 -2.8 -3.5 2.2
23 -2.7 -3.3 2.6
24 -2.2 -3.1
25 -2.2 -2.9
26 -1.6 -3.3
27 -1.2 -3.2
28 -1.3 -4.2
29 -1 -3.8
30 -0.2 -3.1
31 -0.1 -4
32 0.3 -3.4
33 0.7 -3.6
34 0.8 -3.6
35 0.8 -3.4
36 1.2 -3.4

Employment increased by 1,018,500 (or 8.4%) between May 2020 (the trough in the labour market) and July 2021, and is now at a record high, standing 161,600 (or 1.2%) above its pre-pandemic level. Both full-time employment (up by 147,400 or 1.7%) and part-time employment (up by 14,200 or 0.3%) have recovered to be above the levels recorded in March 2020.

Further, despite being initially harder-hit, female employment has increased by 554,100 (or 9.8%) since May 2020 and at July 2021 is 77,700 (or 1.3%) above its pre-pandemic level. Male employment also rose between May 2020 and July 2021 (up by 464,400 or 7.2%) and is 83,900 (or 1.2%) above the level recorded in March 2020, standing at a record high in July 2021.

The unemployment rate fell by 2.4 percentage points over the same period, to 4.6% in July 2021, below the 5.3% recorded in March 2020, while the participation rate rose by 3.4 percentage points between May 2020 and July 2021, to 66.0%.

The recent escalation of COVID-19 cases and subsequent lockdowns, however, particularly in New South Wales, resulted in 37,700 people leaving the labour force nationally in July 2021, while the number of hours worked declined by 3.1 million hours (or 0.2 per cent) over the month. In addition, the number of people who worked zero hours for economic and ‘lockdown-related’ reasons increased by 82,000 (or 26.8 per cent) in July, to 388,400. This is likely to increase further in the period ahead, as the impact of Victoria returning to lockdown in August and the more widespread restrictions in NSW take effect.

Labour market conditions for youth

Youth (persons aged 15 to 24 years) were particularly hard-hit by the pandemic, as they are overrepresented in the service industries that were most severely affected by the initial impact of COVID-19. In addition, young people are particularly vulnerable during economic downturns, as they tend to have fewer skills and less experience than their older counterparts and are often the first to be retrenched by employers in times of economic difficulty.

Between March and May 2020, employment for youth decreased by 329,100 (or 17.0%), accounting for 38.4% of the total contraction in overall employment over the period, despite the cohort comprising just 14.9% of overall employment in March 2020. Against this weaker backdrop, the youth unemployment rate rose sharply, from 11.6% in March 2020, to a peak of 16.4% in July 2020. The rise in the unemployment rate occurred in conjunction with a decrease in the youth participation rate, from 68.2% in March 2020, to a low of 59.7% in May 2020.

In line with the strengthening in overall labour market conditions since May 2020, the youth labour market has also improved. Youth employment rose by 314,200 (or 19.6%) between May 2020 and July 2021, exceeding the growth rate (in percentage terms) of 8.4% recorded in overall employment. Despite this strong rise, youth employment remained 14,900 (or 0.8%) below the level recorded in March 2020. It is important to note, however, that this occurred in conjunction with a substantial fall in the youth population (of 131,800 since March 2020), following the closure of international borders.

Change in employment since start of downturn (%)

The youth unemployment rate decreased to 10.2% in July 2021, the equal lowest rate recorded since January 2009, although it remained more than double the rate recorded for all persons (of 4.6%). In addition, the youth participation rate, at 69.4% in July 2021, was higher than the 68.2% recorded in March 2020.

That said, a large degree of uncertainty remains around the outlook for young people, particularly in light of recent COVID-19 outbreaks. Indeed, it is worth noting that youth employment fell by 10,900 (or 0.6%) over the month to July, alone, while the number of hours worked by youth declined by 0.7% over the period.

Jobs by Location

Jobs by Location Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 13:38
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Jobs by location infographic page. New South Wales is Australia’s largest employing state. One in four Victorians work in either Health Care or Social Assistance or Retail Trade. 32% of Queensland workers hold a certificate 3 or higher vocational qualification. More than 75% of employment in South Australia is concentrated in Adelaide. Nearly 45% of Mining jobs across Australia are in this state. More than half of Tasmanian jobs are located in regional Tasmania. Northern Territory.

New South Wales

New South Wales Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 13:50
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graphic shows 33% of jobs are regional. 14% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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39% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 28% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 28% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in New South Wales

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 566.8 14 70.6 14.2
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 463.4 11 107.2 30.1
Education and Training 394.7 9 75.8 23.8
Retail Trade 394.4 9 13.0 3.4
Construction 350.4 8 7.6 2.2
Accommodation and Food Services 257.7 6 -11.2 -4.2
Public Administration and Safety 257.6 6 48.9 23.4
Manufacturing 255.2 6 -4.8 -1.8
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 217.2 5 13.7 6.7
Financial and Insurance Services 206.0 5 11.0 5.7
Other Services 172.5 4 24.2 16.3
Administrative and Support Services 129.6 3 -9.0 -6.5
Wholesale Trade 121.1 3 -11.3 -8.6
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 81.2 2 -2.8 -3.4
Arts and Recreation Services 80.9 2 9.4 13.2
Information Media and Telecommunications 72.7 2 1.4 1.9
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 71.9 2 -4.6 -6.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 39.6 1 1.6 4.2
Mining 36.8 1 4.1 12.6

New South Wales is the largest employing state in Australia. Most jobs are in Sydney, which accounts for almost 70% of the state’s employment.

Around 70% of the state’s workforce has post-school qualifications and they are more likely to hold a bachelor degree or higher than workers nationally. Greater Sydney has the most highly educated workforce in the state, with 75% holding post-school qualifications (including 46% with a bachelor degree or higher).

There are multiple regions, however, where it is far more common for workers to have VET qualifications rather than those gained through a university (such as the Mid North Coast where 47% of the workforce has a certificate III or higher VET qualification). The age profile of this state is largely in line with the national average, although some regions have relatively large shares of workers aged 15 to 24 years. These include Coffs Harbour – Grafton, Illawarra and the Riverina.

Self-employment may also offer an opportunity for work or a different career path. While it is less common in New South Wales than in some other areas, around 17% of workers are their own boss.

The impact of COVID-19 on the New South Wales labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in New South Wales fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 266,400 or 6.5%). Over the same period, the participation rate also declined, from 65.4% in March 2020, to 62.1% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded in the state since October 2004, while the state’s unemployment rate rose from 5.0% in March 2020, to a peak of 7.1% in July 2020, the highest rate recorded since November 1998.

Labour market conditions strengthened in New South Wales between May 2020 and July 2021, with employment increasing by 257,800 (or 6.7%), while the unemployment rate fell to 4.5% in July 2021. The state’s participation rate increased by 2.8 percentage points over the period, to 64.9% in July 2021. That said, the current COVID-19 outbreak (and associated lockdown) is dampening labour market activity significantly in New South Wales, with 63,600 people leaving the labour force in July. Moreover, employment in the state decreased by 36,400 in July 2021, while total hours worked fell sharply, by 7.0%.

The Internet Vacancy Index fell by 10.3% in July 2021, the strongest decline of any jurisdiction, although it is still 1.2 times higher than its pre-pandemic level. That said, a considerable degree of uncertainty remains around the outlook, particularly with respect to COVID-19 and associated restrictions.

Employment by region, New South Wales

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Sydney 2775.5 233.6 9.2 29 47 14 18 46 24 25
Capital Region 108.8 0.7 0.6 32 48 15 24 25 34 37
Central West 112.2 8.2 7.9 28 46 15 28 20 35 30
Coffs Harbour - Grafton 56 -6.9 -10.9 35 48 18 23 30 31 32
Far West and Orana 53.4 1.1 2 29 47 16 25 23 34 33
Hunter Valley (exc Newcastle) 128.7 4.5 3.6 34 48 14 22 13 48 37
Illawarra 160 18.3 12.9 38 48 17 21 29 34 28
Mid North Coast 81.1 -4 -4.7 40 51 13 32 18 47 27
Murray 57.8 12.3 26.9 35 50 15 23 27 35 35
New England and North West 88.6 7.8 9.6 28 48 14 32 22 39 38
Newcastle and Lake Macquarie 180.2 2.8 1.6 33 50 15 18 29 34 35
Richmond - Tweed 118.4 12.9 12.2 41 50 16 23 19 34 35
Riverina 82 2 2.5 32 48 17 27 18 37 38
Southern Highlands and Shoalhaven 65.3 1.4 2.2 37 49 14 26 21 39 34
New South Wales 4164 334.9 8.7 30 47 14 20 39 28 28
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Victoria

Victoria Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:01
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The Victoria graphic shows 24% of jobs are regional. 13% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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41% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 28% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 26% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Victoria

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 478.3 14 71.7 17.6
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 354.6 10 80.2 29.2
Retail Trade 348.6 10 11.3 3.4
Construction 318.1 9 43.3 15.8
Education and Training 296.3 9 59.1 24.9
Manufacturing 274.5 8 -5.7 -2.0
Accommodation and Food Services 222.2 6 7.3 3.4
Public Administration and Safety 202.1 6 55.5 37.8
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 164.4 5 4.7 2.9
Financial and Insurance Services 143.3 4 26.5 22.7
Other Services 131.2 4 22.8 21.0
Administrative and Support Services 107.9 3 -2.1 -1.9
Wholesale Trade 107.7 3 3.4 3.3
Arts and Recreation Services 83.9 2 15.4 22.4
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 76.8 2 -19.6 -20.3
Information Media and Telecommunications 61.2 2 3.1 5.4
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 51.1 1 7.0 16.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 35.9 1 4.4 13.9
Mining 10.4 0 0.6 5.6

Victoria is the second largest employing state, with the majority of jobs located in Melbourne. While Victorians are employed across all industries, around one in four work in either Health Care and Social Assistance or Retail Trade.

Around 74% of Victorian workers have post-school qualifications, with a relatively large share holding a bachelor degree or higher. Workers in Melbourne are more likely to hold a bachelor degree or higher qualification than those in regional Victoria, where a certificate III or higher VET qualification is relatively more common.

Part-time work accounts for around a third of the state’s total employment. Workers in both Latrobe - Gippsland and Bendigo are the most likely to be employed in this manner (39% and 38%). A full breakdown of part-time work across the state is available in the table below.

The size and diversity of the Victorian labour market means employment opportunities continue to exist across all industries. Employers need workers who are resilient, proactive and capable and, if you are able to demonstrate these attributes, you will stand out from the crowd. Digital skills are also important, with continued enhancements in technology affecting jobs and society more broadly.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Victoria labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19, and against the backdrop of an extended lockdown and trading restrictions in the state over much of the second half of 2020, employment in Victoria fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in the labour market in September 2020 (down by 238,600 or 6.9%).

Moreover, between March and September 2020, 196,700 people left the labour force in the state, pushing the participation rate down, from 66.3% in March 2020, to 62.8% in September 2020, the lowest rate recorded in Victoria since November 2003. In addition, the unemployment rate rose sharply, from 5.2% in March 2020, to a peak of 7.3% in October 2020.

Since the trough in September 2020, employment in Victoria has rebounded strongly, increasing by 259,300 (or 8.1%) and is now 20,700 (or 0.6%) above its pre-pandemic level as at July 2021. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 66.5% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate stood at 4.5%, below the 5.2% recorded in March 2020.

While there has been strong growth in recruitment activity in Victoria, with job advertisements 1.4 times higher than their pre-pandemic level, the recent outbreak of COVID-19 cases in the state, and subsequent lockdown, is likely to dampen labour market activity in the coming months. That said, a considerable degree of uncertainty remains around the outlook, particularly with respect to COVID-19 and associated restrictions.

Employment by region, Victoria

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Melbourne 2612.1 261.8 11.1 31 47 13 17 46 25 25
Ballarat 80.1 7.3 10 37 45 15 21 22 34 39
Bendigo 78.7 10.3 15 38 49 14 27 27 38 30
Geelong 162.3 32.6 25.1 37 48 14 21 33 35 27
Hume 93.6 4.4 5 37 48 9 30 29 40 25
Latrobe - Gippsland 125.1 5.9 4.9 39 47 14 31 17 45 33
North West 67.2 2.6 4.1 34 43 11 31 21 44 25
Shepparton 58.2 -6.8 -10.4 37 49 20 27 14 37 39
Warrnambool and South West 66.2 1.3 2 37 49 17 32 18 42 32
Victoria 3453.7 383.6 12.5 32 47 13 19 41 28 26
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Queensland

Queensland Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:07
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The Queensland graphic shows 51% of jobs are regional. 16% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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31% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 31% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Queensland

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 385.5 15 70.0 22.2
Retail Trade 296.2 11 41.2 16.2
Construction 234.9 9 14.4 6.5
Education and Training 210.8 8 19.0 9.9
Accommodation and Food Services 210.5 8 43.4 26.0
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 197.3 7 39.7 25.2
Manufacturing 193.1 7 26.8 16.1
Public Administration and Safety 148.9 6 -8.5 -5.4
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 140.2 5 2.5 1.8
Other Services 104.5 4 -4.6 -4.3
Administrative and Support Services 88.3 3 4.6 5.5
Mining 83.0 3 32.7 65.0
Financial and Insurance Services 79.5 3 19.5 32.4
Wholesale Trade 77.3 3 10.4 15.6
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 60.8 2 -1.1 -1.7
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 58.1 2 7.5 14.8
Arts and Recreation Services 40.4 2 0.0 0.1
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 31.5 1 -0.8 -2.4
Information Media and Telecommunications 26.0 1 -6.1 -19.0

Queensland is the third largest employing state in Australia, with around half the jobs located in Brisbane and a further 13% in the Gold Coast area.

Given the size and diversity of the Queensland economy, employment opportunities exist across all industries. Health Care and Social Assistance is the largest employing industry in Queensland, with 15% of the state’s employment. There are many roles within this industry that do not require medical qualifications or extensive prior experience. Some of these include Receptionists, General Clerks, Kitchenhands and Commercial Cleaners.

Construction is another large employer, representing around 9% of total employment.

Workers in Queensland are less likely than the national average to hold a bachelor degree or higher, but are more likely to have a certificate III or higher qualification. There is a higher proportion of females employed in this state than the national average and around one in three Queensland workers are employed part-time.

It is worth noting that Queenslanders are more likely to be self-employed than workers in the rest of Australia, with around one in six employed Queenslanders working as their own boss.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Queensland labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19, employment in Queensland fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 198,400 or 7.7%). Over the same period, 154,600 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 65.5% in March 2020, to 61.7% in May 2020. In addition, the unemployment rate rose, from 5.8% in March 2020, to 7.8% in May 2020, before peaking at 8.7% in July 2020, the highest rate since May 2001.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases, and subsequent easing in restrictions in the state, employment increased by 293,400 between May 2020 and July 2021, and is 95,000 (or 3.7%) above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in Queensland increased to 66.6% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is now below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 5.2% in July 2021.

While the Internet Vacancy Index fell by 1.8% over the month to July 2021 (reflecting the lockdown in parts of Queensland at that time) job advertisements remain 1.5 times higher than their pre-pandemic level. Despite the recent absence of community transmission of COVID-19, some uncertainty surrounds the outlook for the Queensland labour market, given rising cases in New South Wales and Victoria (and ongoing border closures), which may also dampen economic and labour market activity in the state.

Employment by region, Queensland

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Brisbane 1287 102.1 8.6 31 48 16 17 38 28 28
Cairns 127.9 20.6 19.2 33 48 13 24 16 45 39
Darling Downs - Maranoa 64.1 0.2 0.3 32 48 14 29 11 35 41
Fitzroy 117.3 3.4 3 33 46 14 25 23 38 31
Gold Coast 342 29.4 9.4 35 50 17 19 29 33 32
Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday 96 7.8 8.9 27 45 14 18 14 47 38
Queensland - Outback 38 3.1 8.9 19 44 11 24 7 54 44
Sunshine Coast 182 8.1 4.7 40 50 17 25 36 30 26
Toowoomba 75.2 4.2 6 29 46 12 21 29 40 29
Townsville 112.9 13.2 13.3 33 49 21 21 20 28 47
Wide Bay 113.3 1.5 1.4 35 50 14 27 21 37 36
Queensland 2644.6 290 12.3 32 48 16 20 31 32 31
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

South Australia

South Australia Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 09:46
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The South Australia graphic shows 23% of jobs are regional. 15% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 16% of workers are self-employed.
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26% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 35% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in South Australia

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 130.4 15 10.4 8.7
Retail Trade 86.3 10 -7.1 -7.6
Education and Training 75.7 9 16.1 27.1
Construction 71.7 8 12.3 20.6
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 70.5 8 15.2 27.5
Public Administration and Safety 68.1 8 9.8 16.8
Manufacturing 66.2 8 -7.5 -10.2
Accommodation and Food Services 58.2 7 0.7 1.3
Other Services 42.9 5 5.6 14.9
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 34.7 4 -1.7 -4.7
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 34.6 4 2.4 7.3
Administrative and Support Services 31.0 4 3.0 10.7
Financial and Insurance Services 21.3 2 0.1 0.3
Wholesale Trade 20.6 2 -3.2 -13.6
Mining 18.6 2 9.8 111.7
Arts and Recreation Services 12.1 1 2.4 25.4
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 10.7 1 -3.3 -23.6
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 9.2 1 1.2 14.8
Information Media and Telecommunications 8.3 1 -2.0 -19.7

South Australia has a relatively small workforce, with around 7% of national employment. Employment is concentrated in Adelaide, which accounts for 77% of state employment.

While there are employment opportunities available across all industries, more than one in three workers are employed in Health Care and Social Assistance, Retail Trade or Education and Training. Information Media and Telecommunications is South Australia’s smallest industry, accounting for 1% of employment.

Part-time employment is relatively common in this state, accounting for around 35% of employment (compared with the national average of 32%). The Barossa - Yorke - Mid North area (encompassing Clare, Peterborough, Port Pirie, Tanunda and Wallaroo) has the largest proportion of part-time employment in the state.

South Australian workers are less likely to hold post-school qualifications than workers nationally. Reversing the national trend, a higher share of workers in this state hold a certificate III or higher vocational qualification (30%) than those who have a bachelor degree or higher (28%).

The impact of COVID-19 on the South Australia labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in South Australia fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 47,400 or 5.5%).

Over the same period, 35,800 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 63.0% in March 2020, to 60.5% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded since July 2002. In addition, the unemployment rate rose, from 6.3% in March 2020, to 7.9% in May 2020, before peaking at 8.7% in June 2020, the highest rate recorded since January 1999.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases, and subsequent easing in restrictions, employment in South Australia increased by 66,400 between May 2020 and July 2021, and is now 19,000 or 2.2% above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 62.9% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 4.7% in July 2021.

Encouragingly, reflecting the relative absence of COVID-19 cases, there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in South Australia, as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements 1.6 times higher in July 2021 than their pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, South Australia

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Adelaide 668 39.4 6.3 35 48 15 20 32 28 34
Barossa - Yorke - Mid North 53.7 3.2 6.3 38 49 10 33 19 45 35
South Australia - Outback 39.4 -0.6 -1.5 32 48 15 25 5 42 44
South Australia - South East 86.9 -0.4 -0.5 38 46 17 26 14 36 39
South Australia 871.1 65.7 8.2 35 48 15 21 28 30 35
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Western Australia

Western Australia Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 09:54
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The West Australia graphic shows 22% of jobs are regional. 14% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 15% of workers are self-employed.
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32% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 31% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 31% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Western Australia

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 202.0 15 50.5 33.3
Education and Training 131.5 9 39.9 43.6
Construction 128.7 9 -5.5 -4.1
Retail Trade 123.8 9 -11.7 -8.7
Mining 120.0 9 12.7 11.9
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 105.6 8 10.8 11.4
Accommodation and Food Services 88.9 6 -1.2 -1.4
Manufacturing 84.9 6 1.2 1.4
Public Administration and Safety 84.8 6 0.9 1.0
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 75.7 5 12.6 19.9
Other Services 56.7 4 -1.6 -2.8
Administrative and Support Services 43.0 3 2.6 6.5
Wholesale Trade 33.3 2 -5.9 -15.2
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 31.2 2 -0.4 -1.3
Financial and Insurance Services 28.6 2 1.2 4.2
Arts and Recreation Services 26.5 2 -1.9 -6.8
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 20.5 1 3.5 20.5
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 18.1 1 -4.4 -19.7
Information Media and Telecommunications 8.7 1 -7.3 -45.9

Western Australia is the fourth largest employing state, with employment mostly located in Perth.

The largest employing industry in Western Australia is Health Care and Social Assistance. Demand for work in this industry is only going to increase given Australia’s ageing population. It is worth noting that not everyone employed in this industry is a doctor or a nurse.

Some of the top employing occupations in Health Care and Social Assistance include Receptionists, General Clerks, Kitchenhands and Commercial Cleaners. These are all occupations that can be perfect entry level positions and generally require minimal qualifications or prior experience.

Unlike the rest of Australia, a large proportion of Western Australians are employed in the Mining industry (around one in 10 workers). Reflecting this, around 45% of total Mining employment is in this state.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Western Australia labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in Western Australia fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 95,600 or 6.9%).

Over the same period, 67,300 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 68.2% in March 2020, to 65.0% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded since August 2004. In addition, the unemployment rate rose sharply, from 5.7% in March 2020, to 8.0% in May 2020, before peaking at 8.5% in June 2020, the highest rate recorded since June 1994.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases, and subsequent easing in restrictions, however, employment in Western Australia increased by 128,700 between May 2020 and July 2021 and is now 33,200 (or 2.4%) above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 68.5% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is now below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 4.6% in July 2021.

While the outbreak of COVID-19 across a number of Australian jurisdictions has increased the level of uncertainty across much of the country, it is encouraging to note that there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in Western Australia (reflecting the relative absence of COVID-19), as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements now 1.6 times higher in July 2021 than the pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, Western Australia

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Perth 1087.5 44.4 4.3 34 47 14 19 35 28 30
Bunbury 91.8 -2.3 -2.4 33 46 19 20 21 42 35
Western Australia - Outback 114.9 -4.7 -3.9 25 43 9 20 29 40 28
Western Australia - Wheat Belt 70.9 10.1 16.6 37 45 9 32 16 39 40
Western Australia 1391.8 79.6 6.1 33 47 14 20 32 31 31
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Tasmania

Tasmania Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:17
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The Tasmania graphic shows 54% of jobs are regional. 15% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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28% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 33% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Tasmania

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 41.6 16 7.2 21.1
Retail Trade 29.6 11 2.5 9.2
Accommodation and Food Services 25.3 10 7.3 40.7
Education and Training 21.5 8 0.4 2.0
Public Administration and Safety 19.8 8 2.1 12.0
Manufacturing 19.8 8 0.1 0.6
Construction 19.5 7 1.9 10.9
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 13.9 5 1.9 15.7
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 13.0 5 3.6 37.8
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 10.9 4 -1.7 -13.8
Other Services 9.9 4 0.8 8.6
Administrative and Support Services 8.4 3 1.3 18.8
Wholesale Trade 5.7 2 0.5 10.4
Arts and Recreation Services 5.1 2 0.3 5.7
Financial and Insurance Services 5.0 2 0.0 -0.7
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 4.1 2 -0.3 -6.2
Mining 3.1 1 0.3 11.9
Information Media and Telecommunications 3.0 1 -0.1 -3.6
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 2.5 1 -1.6 -38.5

While Tasmania is the smallest employing state, there are employment opportunities available across all industries.

Health Care and Social Assistance is the largest employing industry (accounting for 16% of the workforce), followed by Retail Trade and Accommodation and Food Services.

Tasmania has the oldest workforce of any state or territory, with 46% aged 45 years or older. Part-time work is also relatively common (39% of state employment, the largest share in Australia). Workers in this state are less likely than the national average to have a bachelor degree or higher, although they are more likely to have completed a certificate III or higher vocational qualification.

Tasmania has the most regionally diverse workforce in Australia, with more than half of all workers employed outside of Hobart.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Tasmania labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in Tasmania fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 18,100 or 7.0%).

Over the same period, 15,400 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 61.0% in March 2020, to 57.4% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded since April 2002. In addition, the unemployment rate rose sharply, from 5.0% in March 2020, to 6.4% in May 2020, before peaking at 7.9% in October 2020, the highest rate recorded since September 2013.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases and subsequent easing in restrictions, however, employment in Tasmania rebounded strongly, increasing by 23,200 between May 2020 and July 2021, and is now 5,100 (or 2.0%) above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 61.3% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is now below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 4.5% in July 2021.

While the outbreak of COVID-19 cases across a number of jurisdictions has increased the level of uncertainty across much of the country, it is encouraging to note that there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in Tasmania (reflecting its COVID-19 free status), as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements now 1.7 times higher in July 2021 than their pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, Tasmania

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Hobart 118.8 12.4 11.6 40 47 15 22 36 29 28
Launceston and North East 70.3 5.3 8.1 36 49 15 25 25 32 37
South East 17.7 1.5 9.3 43 47 10 33 24 38 29
West and North West 48.5 -3.1 -6.1 37 47 14 27 18 36 37
Tasmania 259 23.4 9.9 39 47 15 25 28 32 33
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Northern Territory

Northern Territory Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:25
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The Northern Territory graphic shows 37% of jobs are regional. 12% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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33% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 32% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in the Northern Territory

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 22.1 17 4.8 27.9
Public Administration and Safety 22.0 17 -3.1 -12.2
Construction 12.3 9 -2.1 -14.6
Education and Training 10.8 8 0.8 8.0
Retail Trade 9.9 8 -1.2 -11.1
Accommodation and Food Services 9.9 8 -0.5 -4.6
Other Services 8.1 6 2.0 32.8
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 6.7 5 1.2 22.6
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 6.3 5 -1.7 -20.9
Administrative and Support Services 5.7 4 2.6 82.6
Mining 3.1 2 -4.8 -60.3
Arts and Recreation Services 3.0 2 -0.5 -13.4
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 3.0 2 1.8 -
Manufacturing 3.0 2 -0.8 -21.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 1.9 1 -0.2 -7.3
Wholesale Trade 1.6 1 -2.0 -56.5
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 1.4 1 -1.2 -46.1
Financial and Insurance Services 0.9 1 -0.6 -
Information Media and Telecommunications 0.7 1 0.1 -

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in the Northern Territory fell by 8,600 (or 6.4%) between March 2020 and September 2020. Over the same period, the participation rate in the territory decreased, from 75.6% in March 2020, to 70.5% in September 2020, while the unemployment rate rose, from 5.2% in March 2020, to a peak of 7.3% in July 2020.

Since September 2020, employment in the Northern Territory has increased by 2,600 but remains 6,100 (or 4.5%) below its pre-pandemic level. While the unemployment rate in the territory, at 4.6% in July 2021, is below the pre-pandemic rate, the participation rate is also below that recorded in March 2020, standing at 71.2%.

Encouragingly, reflecting the relative absence of COVID-19 cases, there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in the Northern Territory, as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements 1.5 times higher than the pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, Northern Territory

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Darwin 82.4 -3.8 -4.4 23 47 14 17 30 35 32
NT - Outback 47.7 -0.7 -1.5 26 48 10 22 49 21 29
Northern Territory 131 -6.5 -4.7 24 48 12 19 34 30 32
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Note: While September 2020 was the trough recorded in employment for the Northern Territory during the immediate aftermath of the pandemic, employment in the territory was at a lower level in June 2021. It should be noted that data for the Northern Territory contains a degree of volatility and should be interpreted with caution.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Australian Capital Territory

Australian Capital Territory Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:30
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to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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49% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 21% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in the Australian Capital Territory

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Public Administration and Safety 66.2 28 -1.2 -1.8
Health Care and Social Assistance 32.3 14 9.2 40.1
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 30.1 13 6.4 26.8
Education and Training 19.4 8 4.6 31.2
Retail Trade 19.1 8 2.3 14.0
Construction 17.5 7 3.4 23.9
Accommodation and Food Services 13.9 6 0.9 7.3
Other Services 9.6 4 2.8 41.7
Administrative and Support Services 6.2 3 0.3 5.6
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 5.8 2 -1.5 -20.3
Arts and Recreation Services 5.6 2 1.0 22.7
Financial and Insurance Services 3.2 1 -2.4 -42.7
Manufacturing 3.0 1 -1.3 -29.8
Information Media and Telecommunications 2.9 1 0.0 -1.3
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 1.4 1 0.0 -
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 1.4 1 -1.8 -57.5
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 1.3 1 -0.7 -
Wholesale Trade 1.0 0.4 -0.7 -
Mining 0.2 0.1 0.1 -

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in the ACT fell by 9,900 (or 4.2%) between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020. Over the same period, the participation rate in the ACT decreased, from 72.3% in March 2020, to 69.7% in May 2020, while the unemployment rate rose, from 3.2% in March 2020, to a peak of 4.8% in June 2020 in the immediate aftermath of the pandemic.

Employment in the ACT increased by 4,200 between May 2020 and July 2021 but remains 5,800 (or 2.4%) below its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the territory, at 70.8% in July 2021, is below the rate recorded in March 2020, while the unemployment rate, at 4.3% in July 2021, is above the pre-pandemic rate.

Encouragingly, there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in the ACT, as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements 1.2 times higher than the pre-pandemic level, although the recent outbreak of COVID-19 cases, and associated lockdown and restrictions, is likely to dampen labour market activity in the coming months.

Employment by region

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
ACT 237.2 18.7 8.5 27 50 15 16 49 21 27
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Jobs by Industry

Jobs by Industry Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:12
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This image displays the top five largest employing industries in Australia. Health Care and Social Assistance. This industry accounts for 14% of Australian workers. 78% are female and the top employing occupations are Registered Nurses, Aged and Disabled Carers and Child Carers.

Health Care and Social Assistance

Health Care and Social Assistance Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:13
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This image shows 33% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 9% of workers are self-employed.
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51% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 15% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Health Care and Social Assistance is Australia’s largest employing industry and, given the COVID-19 pandemic, has a critically important workforce. It covers health services like hospitals, General Practitioners, dental and ambulance services, as well as child care and aged care.

Top employing occupations

Occupation This industry All industries
Registered Nurses 283,800 309,100
Aged and Disabled Carers 216,100 240,900
Receptionists 98,200 164,500
Child Carers 87,100 132,500
Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers 84,300 92,700
General Practitioners and Resident Medical Officers 66,900 70,200
Welfare Support Workers 38,900 72,800
General Clerks 36,400 311,200
Psychologists 27,500 31,900
Physiotherapists 27,500 34,800
Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses 25,700 26,200
Health and Welfare Services Managers 26,200 32,900
Medical Technicians 25,000 33,800
Social Workers 24,700 40,500
Kitchenhands 24,300 138,800
Midwives 23,400 25,900
Practice Managers 23,300 27,400
Dental Assistants 21,800 21,900
Nurse Managers 18,300 23,900
Welfare, Recreation and Community Arts Workers 21,500 33,800

This industry has a large proportion of part-time workers, with 45% of the workforce employed part-time (compared with the Australian average of 32%). There is also a significant share of female workers in Health Care and Social Assistance (nearly four in five workers are female).

Post-school education is commonly required in this industry with more than 80% of the workers having a post-school qualification. Qualifications are often mandatory for employment and training opportunities exist in both the higher education and VET sectors.

Demand is expected to continue for this industry, given the COVID-19 pandemic and Australia’s ageing population.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Education and Training

Education and Training Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:15
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This image shows 30% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 6% of workers are self-employed.
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69% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 18% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 10% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Education and Training is one of Australia’s largest employing industries, and includes teaching occupations across all levels of schools, as well as University Lecturers and Tutors. Around 72% of the workforce is female, the second highest percentage for any industry within Australia. Part-time work is also relatively common (around 40% of workers).

Top employing occupations

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Primary School Teachers 166,300 178,900
Secondary School Teachers 120,300 121,000
Education Aides 99,100 118,800
University Lecturers and Tutors 59,400 60,400
Private Tutors and Teachers 45,600 51,900
Child Carers 37,100 132,500
General Clerks 36,200 311,200
Vocational Education Teachers 29,600 38,000
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers 27,900 51,100
Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials 25,600 62,700
School Principals 23,100 23,900
Special Education Teachers 17,200 17,800
Education Advisers and Reviewers 18,100 19,800
Commercial Cleaners 15,800 167,000
Other Education Managers 10,800 12,800
Office Managers 10,500 115,900
Counsellors 9,300 25,700
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 9,100 123,000
Receptionists 8,300 164,500
ICT Support Technicians 6,600 61,100

Most people who work in Education and Training have post-school qualifications, with more than two-thirds of workers holding a bachelor degree or higher (the highest of any industry). Reflecting the time taken to gain these qualifications, only 9% of this workforce is aged 15 to 24 years old. While most jobs need a university degree, lower skilled jobs like Education Aides can provide an employment pathway to enter the industry.

In addition, a relatively large share of workers is aged 55 years or older (23%), which suggests retirements will create employment opportunities in this industry over the next decade.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Construction

Construction Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:23
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This image shows 31% of jobs are regional. 15% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 35% of workers are self-employed.
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13% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 49% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 31% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Construction is one of Australia’s largest employing industries, with employment opportunities available at all skill and experience levels across the country. The most common entry into this industry is through the completion of an apprenticeship or traineeship, which is reflected in the workforce’s educational attainment (almost half of workers possess a certificate III or higher VET qualification).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Carpenters and Joiners 113,600 143,100
Electricians 109,600 175,900
Construction Managers 95,500 116,700
Plumbers 77,100 84,600
Building and Plumbing Labourers 48,400 63,200
Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians 40,300 78,200
Painting Trades Workers 39,400 44,400
Earthmoving Plant Operators 33,500 47,600
Concreters 28,000 31,500
Plasterers 22,100 22,500
Gardeners 26,700 83,000
Accounting Clerks 23,100 144,100
Handypersons 23,100 46,700
General Clerks 23,000 311,200
Civil Engineering Professionals 20,800 53,000
Wall and Floor Tilers 19,300 20,700
Bricklayers and Stonemasons 19,100 24,100
Office Managers 17,600 115,900
Truck Drivers 17,000 160,500
Insulation and Home Improvement Installers 16,000 22,600

Around one in three workers, though, do not possess any post-school qualifications and 15% of the workforce are Labourers, which suggests there are some good entry level opportunities. Around one in three employers may not formally advertise when recruiting. Rather, employers in the Construction industry may rely on word of mouth or more informal recruitment methods (such as advertising on social media).

This industry offers plenty of opportunities for self-employment, and more than one in three workers report being their own boss.

The Construction workforce is predominantly male and has the lowest percentage of female employment of any industry (14%).

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Manufacturing

Manufacturing Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:28
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This image shows 31% of jobs are regional. 11% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 13% of workers are self-employed.
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22% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 35% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 36% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Australia’s Manufacturing industry is a very diverse sector and covers the manufacture of food and beverages, petroleum and coal, polymer products, machinery, furniture and more. While it is common for workers to hold a certificate III or higher VET qualification, employers in this industry also value trade experience and practical knowledge. This is shown by the sizeable proportion of workers who do not have post-school qualifications (more than a third of the workforce).

While almost 100,000 young people are employed in Manufacturing, they represent a relatively small part of this industry (11% are aged 15 to 24 years old).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers 49,400 77,500
Production Managers 38,300 61,500
Packers 31,400 71,300
Metal Fitters and Machinists 30,400 106,000
Food and Drink Factory Workers 24,500 29,900
Cabinetmakers 23,100 25,700
Product Assemblers 19,600 22,200
Manufacturers 19,300 24,400
Sales Assistants (General) 19,000 586,200
Bakers and Pastrycooks 18,900 39,600
Storepersons 17,800 137,900
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 17,500 94,000
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 17,400 156,500
Forklift Drivers 16,900 61,400
Accounting Clerks 14,300 144,100
Sales Representatives 14,100 65,900
Engineering Production Workers 13,900 14,600
Meat, Poultry and Seafood Process Workers 13,400 17,100
Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers 12,500 41,400
Printers 10,600 12,900

Employment in this industry is typically full-time (83%). There are a range of job opportunities in the Manufacturing industry, across different levels of skill and experience. Most workers in the industry are employed as Technicians and Trades Workers (27%), Labourers (18%) or Managers (17%).

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:32
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This image shows 17% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 26% of workers are self-employed.
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63% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 20% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 14% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services is a large and diverse industry and includes legal and accounting services, veterinary services, and computer system design. Employment is mostly located in capital cities and 65% of jobs are concentrated in New South Wales and Victoria.

This is a highly skilled workforce, with more than 80% holding post-school qualifications. Reflecting the time it takes to attain the required qualifications, a small share of this workforce is young (aged 15 to 24 years old). Workers in the industry are mostly employed as Professionals (62%).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Accountants 99,200 198,100
Software and Applications Programmers 91,600 150,700
Solicitors 68,800 96,600
Management and Organisation Analysts 44,200 101,500
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 40,700 88,900
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 35,000 156,500
ICT Support Technicians 33,300 61,100
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators 30,000 54,100
Bookkeepers 28,200 97,100
ICT Managers 27,600 84,400
Architects and Landscape Architects 27,200 46,400
General Clerks 27,100 311,200
Civil Engineering Professionals 25,900 53,000
Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians 18,700 78,200
Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists 18,600 52,800
Computer Network Professionals 17,300 38,600
ICT Business and Systems Analysts 15,600 41,100
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 14,500 123,000
Conveyancers and Legal Executives 14,300 14,600
Office Managers 14,200 115,900

There are opportunities to work as your own boss within this industry, with more than a quarter of the workforce self-employed.

While dependent on the role they are performing, workers in this industry often have scope to work remotely. In December 2020, around half (49%) of the businesses in the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services industry still had staff working from home, compared with 16% across all industries.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Financial and Insurance Services

Financial and Insurance Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:40
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This image shows 13% of jobs are regional. 5% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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 57% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 20% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 19% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Employment in the Financial and Insurance Services industry includes banking, insurance and superannuation funds, as well as financial brokering services. Employment is concentrated primarily in capital cities, particularly along Australia’s east coast, with around 40% of the workforce located in New South Wales.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Bank Workers 42,700 44,800
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers 42,000 52,100
Financial Brokers 31,300 32,800
Insurance, Money Market and Statistical Clerks 28,600 30,700
Credit and Loans Officers 28,200 31,000
Accountants 20,100 198,100
Software and Applications Programmers 16,900 150,700
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 15,500 156,500
Financial Dealers 14,600 17,800
Insurance Agents 14,000 15,800
Finance Managers 13,700 68,700
General Clerks 12,600 311,200
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 12,600 76,800
Management and Organisation Analysts 12,500 101,500
Auditors, Company Secretaries and Corporate Treasurers 10,600 32,800
Information Officers 9,300 88,300
ICT Managers 7,600 84,400
Other Information and Organisation Professionals 7,200 49,000
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 7,200 123,000
Call or Contact Centre Workers 7,200 33,600

This workforce is highly qualified, with 77% holding post-school qualifications (compared with 65% across all industries). Almost all jobs are for Professionals, Clerical and Administrative Workers and Managers.

Reflecting the time it takes to attain the required qualifications, a small share of this workforce is aged 15 to 24 years old (just 5%). That said, Bank Workers is the largest employing occupation within Financial and Insurance Services and this role generally does not require post-school qualifications and can provide a pathway into the industry. 

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Retail Trade

Retail Trade Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:44
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This image shows 33% of jobs are regional. 32% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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21% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 24% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 50% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Retail Trade was one of the industries most severely affected by COVID-19, however, employment in the industry has rebounded strongly. Across 2020, 21% of businesses in this industry reported that COVID-19 had a positive impact on their business, likely driven by increased sales volume at grocery stores and for home office equipment such as electronics and furniture. Retail Trade remains Australia’s second largest employing industry.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
General Sales Assistants 389,800 586,200
Retail Managers 153,200 262,500
Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers 118,600 142,100
Shelf Fillers 62,800 65,000
Storepersons 36,800 137,900
Pharmacy Sales Assistants 36,100 38,200
Retail Supervisors 33,600 44,400
Pharmacists 28,600 42,600
Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons 24,700 27,800
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 18,200 94,000
Butchers and Smallgoods Makers 16,100 20,700
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 15,200 156,500
Sales Representatives 14,900 65,900
General Clerks 12,600 311,200
Motor Mechanics 12,600 106,600
Service Station Attendants 9,100 9,600
Accounting Clerks 10,600 144,100
Packers 9,900 71,300
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 9,800 88,900
Delivery Drivers 9,700 74,900

Retail employs more young people than most other industries. This is because entry level roles within the industry generally do not require prior experience or qualifications, with half the workers having no post-school qualifications. Many occupations in the industry can also provide flexible hours, allowing work around school and other commitments.

It is important to remember that jobs in this industry might not always be formally advertised. When looking for work in Retail Trade remember to ask friends, family and any other contacts if they are aware of any job opportunities. Opportunities might be available by word-of-mouth, or via signs in shop windows and through social media.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Wholesale Trade

Wholesale Trade Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:51
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This image shows 26% of jobs are regional. 8% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 14% of workers are self-employed.
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27% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 38% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Wholesalers do not usually have a shop front to sell their items; they are the middle step between producers and retailers. It is one of the smaller employing industries, with employment mainly located in the capital cities along Australia’s east coast.

While close to 40% of this workforce does not have post-school qualifications, only a small share of this industry are younger workers (8% are aged 15 to 24 years).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Storepersons 28,600 137,900
Importers, Exporters and Wholesalers 20,800 25,800
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 20,700 94,000
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 20,400 156,500
General Sales Assistants 19,500 586,200
Sales Representatives 17,700 65,900
Retail Managers 14,200 262,500
Technical Sales Representatives 12,500 23,500
General Clerks 10,900 311,200
Forklift Drivers 9,500 61,400
Accounting Clerks 9,300 144,100
Truck Drivers 9,000 160,500
Delivery Drivers 8,200 74,900
Metal Fitters and Machinists 7,100 106,000
Office Managers 6,800 115,900
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers 6,600 41,800
Accountants 5,500 198,100
Packers 5,100 71,300
Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons 4,500 27,800
Production Managers 4,100 61,500

From June to December 2020, Wholesale Trade showed the lowest level of recruitment by any industry with just 27% of employers stating they were or had recruited in the past month. Around one in five employers in this industry also don’t advertise their vacancies, instead relying on word-of-mouth or recruiting job seekers who approach their business. Although entry level opportunities exist in every industry, positions in Wholesale Trade may be better suited to older job seekers who possess the practical experience employers seek and have the connections to find work in this industry.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Mining

Mining Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:21
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This image shows 51% of jobs are regional. 6% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 1% of workers are self-employed.
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25% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 43% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Mining is an important industry in terms of its export revenue, but it is a relatively small employing industry (accounting for around 2% of Australian jobs). Employment is largely concentrated in Western Australia and Queensland, and the majority of jobs are located in regional areas. Exploration is a large component of the industry, with Western Australia currently being the major location for minerals exploration.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Drillers, Miners and Shot Firers 47,500 57,100
Metal Fitters and Machinists 25,800 106,000
Other Building and Engineering Technicians 17,100 35,100
Electricians 11,100 175,900
Mining Engineers 9,400 15,400
Production Managers 9,300 61,500
Truck Drivers 9,200 160,500
Earthmoving Plant Operators 6,500 47,600
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers 6,400 77,500
Other Construction and Mining Labourers 5,100 7,400
Geologists, Geophysicists and Hydrogeologists 4,800 13,000
Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers 4,600 41,400
Accountants 4,200 198,100
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 3,900 123,000
General Clerks 3,600 311,200
Engineering Managers 3,400 27,700
Chemical, Gas, Petroleum and Power Generation Plant Operators 3,100 10,600
Occupational and Environmental Health Professionals 2,700 27,200
Structural Steel Construction Workers 2,700 22,600
Office Managers 2,500 115,900

Western Australia also has more than 300 mining and petroleum projects in operation, which produce more than 50 commodities for the global market.

Workers are often expected to travel for work, with fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) arrangements relatively common.

Post-school qualifications are often required to work in Mining. Around 43% of workers hold a certificate III or higher vocational qualification, and 25% possess a bachelor degree or higher. Almost a third of workers are Technicians and Trades Workers, 29% are Machinery Operators and Drivers, and 17% are Professionals.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:25
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This image shows 81% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 55% of workers are self-employed.
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14% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 28% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 10% of workers hold an other qualification. 48% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing is an industry largely made up of workers employed in agribusiness. Most are farmers, living in regional Australia and managing their own properties. This is reflected in the high level of self-employment (around one in two workers, the highest percentage of any industry). Around 43% of workers are aged 55 years or older (again, the highest of any industry).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Livestock Farmers 87,100 90,600
Crop Farmers 40,600 40,800
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmers 27,200 28,000
Crop Farm Workers 22,400 24,900
Livestock Farm Workers 24,600 27,200
Agricultural, Forestry and Horticultural Plant Operators 10,700 12,500
Bookkeepers 7,800 97,100
Packers 4,900 71,300
Garden and Nursery Labourers 4,900 35,500
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farm Workers 1,300 1,300
Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers 4,000 12,200
General Clerks 4,000 311,200
Agricultural and Forestry Scientists 3,600 6,500
Deck and Fishing Hands 2,700 5,400
Truck Drivers 2,400 160,500
Accounting Clerks 2,200 144,100
Retail Managers 2,100 262,500
Animal Attendants and Trainers 1,800 21,500
Office Managers 1,800 115,900

The need for formal qualifications is less common, with around half of this workforce having no post-school qualifications. Instead, practical skills and experience are more highly valued, with many of these skills being learnt on the job. Formal qualifications, though, can be gained through the VET sector which also contributes to this industry’s skills. It is important to note, however, that technologically advanced production systems (i.e. farm automation, artificial intelligence) are becoming more common and the employers who use such systems will require more highly skilled workers.

When looking for work in this industry, seasonal work such as fruit picking is fairly common and may present short-term opportunities for job seekers of all ages.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Accommodation and Food Services

Accommodation and Food Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:27
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This image shows 35% of jobs are regional. 45% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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15% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 24% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 57% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Accommodation and Food Services provides many opportunities for young people looking for their first job, or for mature aged workers looking to re-enter the workforce. Most entry level roles within this industry generally do not need prior experience or qualifications, with more than half of workers having no post-school qualifications. Many occupations also provide flexible hours (around 62% of workers are employed part-time), allowing work around school and other commitments.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Waiters 109,000 131,700
Kitchenhands 90,800 138,800
Bar Attendants and Baristas 86,300 103,400
General Sales Assistants 75,500 586,200
Chefs 72,600 91,200
Cafe and Restaurant Managers 54,400 65,500
Fast Food Cooks 43,600 44,500
Retail Managers 30,200 262,500
Cafe Workers 28,700 33,100
Cooks 25,000 43,600
Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers 21,000 142,100
Hotel and Motel Managers 18,900 24,700
Commercial Cleaners 16,200 167,000
Receptionists 12,400 164,500
Housekeepers 11,900 28,100
Delivery Drivers 11,100 74,900
Hotel Service Managers 6,400 9,500
Vending Machine Attendants 4,500 6,800
Bakers and Pastrycooks 4,500 39,600
Handypersons 4,200 46,700

Employment in Accommodation and Food Services has rebounded from COVID-19 lows, and the industry continues to provide many jobs. There are employment opportunities within this industry across most occupation groups, and in all states and territories. If you are seeking work in Accommodation and Food Services, consider looking online as 36% of employers in the industry use social media when recruiting.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Arts and Recreation Services

Arts and Recreation Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:35
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This image shows 29% of jobs are regional. 25% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 20% of workers are self-employed.
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38% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 27% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 30% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Arts and Recreation Services has a relatively young workforce (25% are aged 15 to 24 years), with most commonly employed as Community and Personal Service Workers (27% of employment) or Professionals (25%).

This is a relatively small employing industry, accounting for around 2% of Australian jobs. There are, though, opportunities for flexible work, with one in five workers self-employed, and almost half employed part-time.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials 18,900 62,700
Fitness Instructors 11,700 38,900
Amusement, Fitness and Sports Centre Managers 10,200 16,200
Music Professionals 7,400 13,000
Sportspersons 7,300 8,600
Visual Arts and Crafts Professionals 6,600 12,500
Receptionists 6,600 164,500
Gaming Workers 6,400 9,300
Gardeners 6,100 83,000
Greenkeepers 6,100 12,800
Other Specialist Managers 5,700 52,200
Actors, Dancers and Other Entertainers 5,400 8,400
Authors, and Book and Script Editors 4,700 9,400
Animal Attendants and Trainers 4,500 21,500
Sales Assistants (General) 4,100 586,200
Bar Attendants and Baristas 4,100 103,400
Journalists and Other Writers 3,900 27,900
Commercial Cleaners 3,700 167,000
General Clerks 3,500 311,200
Livestock Farm Workers 3,500 27,200

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant negative impact on employment in Arts and Recreation Services, however, the industry has rebounded strongly. While some organisations have been gradually reopening and transitioning to new ways of working, businesses in some parts of the country remain on hold.

Through the COVID-19 pandemic, some businesses transitioned to new ways of working (for example, delivering fitness classes via online video conferencing, live streaming or video on demand). These new ways of working could create long term changes to the way organisations in this industry operate.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

Transport, Postal and Warehousing Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:40
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This image shows 26% of jobs are regional. 8% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 21% of workers are self-employed.
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21% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 27% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 45% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Transport, Postal and Warehousing is a diverse industry that revolves around the movement of people and goods by road, rail or air. Postal and courier services, warehousing and storage are also included.

While qualifications are generally not needed for occupations in this industry (almost half of the workers do not have post-school qualifications), licences and tickets may be required. Examples include a forklift licence, truck/heavy vehicle licence, construction white card and 'working at heights' ticket.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Truck Drivers 109,100 160,500
Automobile Drivers 47,700 48,600
Storepersons 39,600 137,900
Bus and Coach Drivers 38,100 47,900
Couriers and Postal Deliverers 36,700 47,300
Delivery Drivers 33,800 74,900
Forklift Drivers 23,200 61,400
Transport and Despatch Clerks 21,300 35,500
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers 17,000 41,800
Train and Tram Drivers 10,000 11,100
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 12,300 94,000
Mail Sorters 10,700 15,300
Sales Assistants (General) 10,400 586,200
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 9,400 70,500
General Clerks 9,300 311,200
Transport Services Managers 9,000 14,300
Freight and Furniture Handlers 8,500 15,100
Air Transport Professionals 8,000 9,100
Accounting Clerks 7,800 144,100
Motor Mechanics 7,400 106,600

Around one in five workers are either self-employed or work part-time, suggesting that there are options for contract work or flexible hours. This includes Bus and Coach Drivers, Delivery Drivers and Truck Drivers. There are also job opportunities with around 60% of employers recruiting in this industry stating they had difficulty filling their vacancies from August to December 2020.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:47
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This image shows 34% of jobs are regional. 7% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 7% of workers are self-employed.
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35% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 39% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 22% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services is a relatively small employing industry, accounting for around 1% of Australian jobs. This industry covers electricity supply, generation, transmission and distribution, gas supply, water supply as well as sewerage and waste disposal.

The electricity supply sector is responsible for the generation of electricity as well as its transmission and distribution. It is also responsible for arranging the sale of electricity via power distribution systems operated by others. With around 90% of national energy currently coming from the burning of fossil fuels, employment opportunities will exist moving forward as the industry identifies ways which will allow Australians to produce more of its electricity from renewable sources.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Truck Drivers 10,600 160,500
Electricians 8,300 175,900
Electrical Engineers 6,000 29,100
Electrical Distribution Trades Workers 5,500 5,600
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 4,100 123,000
Building and Plumbing Labourers 3,400 63,200
Other Specialist Managers 3,300 52,200
Plumbers 3,300 84,600
Other Stationary Plant Operators 3,200 20,100
Chemical, Gas, Petroleum and Power Generation Plant Operators 3,200 10,600
Metal Fitters and Machinists 3,200 106,000
Other Factory Process Workers 2,900 14,800
ICT Managers 2,800 84,400
General Clerks 2,800 311,200
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 2,400 156,500
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 2,400 76,800
Other Building and Engineering Technicians 2,300 35,100
Information Officers 2,300 88,300
Office Managers 2,200 115,900
Software and Applications Programmers 2,200 150,700

This industry has a highly skilled workforce, with nearly three quarters of the workforce having a post-school qualification (78%). The VET sector is the main training pathway and entry into this industry is predominantly though the completion of an apprenticeship or traineeship.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Administrative and Support Services

Administrative and Support Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:09
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This image shows 29% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 30% of workers are self-employed.
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26% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 29% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 38% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Administrative and Support Services is a small but essential industry which covers many services including office administration, debt collection, call centres, travel agencies, building cleaning, pest control and gardening services. Given the top two employing occupations in this industry are cleaner roles, demand for these services is likely to be maintained as businesses increase both the frequency and rigorousness of their cleaning schedules in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Commercial Cleaners 84,700 167,000
Gardeners 31,700 83,000
Domestic Cleaners 27,900 39,500
Human Resource Professionals 26,200 80,400
Tourism and Travel Advisers 11,000 12,600
General Clerks 12,200 311,200
Garden and Nursery Labourers 11,100 35,500
Packers 9,500 71,300
Conference and Event Organisers 9,400 28,700
Human Resource Managers 7,900 72,000
Call or Contact Centre Workers 7,400 33,600
Handypersons 7,400 46,700
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 7,000 76,800
Other Cleaners 6,800 10,500
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 6,200 156,500
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 5,700 70,500
Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers 5,500 12,200
Housekeepers 5,000 28,100
Accounting Clerks 4,600 144,100
Information Officers 4,400 88,300

This industry provides good part-time employment opportunities, with 43% of the workforce employed in this manner. Many jobs also do not need post-school qualifications, although some practical experience may be highly regarded by employers. Jobs like cleaning and gardening can be physically demanding and may not be suited to all job seekers.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Public Administration and Safety

Public Administration and Safety Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:13
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This image shows 30% of jobs are regional. 5% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 2% of workers are self-employed.
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44% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 29% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 23% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Public Administration and Safety includes federal, state and local government administration and services like the police force. It has been one of the few industries to experience growth during the COVID-19 pandemic. The increase in workers is potentially due to the development and implementation of support programs as part of the Australian Government’s COVID-19 economic response, or equivalent state and territory government initiatives.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
General Clerks 75,200 311,200
Police 67,800 70,900
Security Officers and Guards 40,400 52,500
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 35,700 123,000
Intelligence and Policy Analysts 25,600 34,400
Inspectors and Regulatory Officers 24,400 33,600
Prison Officers 20,300 20,400
Information Officers 18,500 88,300
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 17,800 70,500
Policy and Planning Managers 16,200 33,000
Fire and Emergency Workers 15,800 20,300
Welfare Support Workers 14,300 72,800
Other Information and Organisation Professionals 13,400 49,000
Office Managers 13,400 115,900
Accounting Clerks 12,300 144,100
Human Resource Managers 12,100 72,000
Accountants 11,900 198,100
Urban and Regional Planners 11,500 19,500
Welfare, Recreation and Community Arts Workers 10,800 33,800
Human Resource Professionals 9,600 80,400

This workforce is relatively skilled (around three quarters of workers hold post-school qualifications), relatively old (just 5% are aged 15 to 24 years) and full-time work is common (83% of employment). Given this, there are fewer opportunities for entry level positions within this industry. All federal government departments, though, offer graduate programs for university graduates interested in a career in the Australian Public Service.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Information Media and Telecommunications

Information Media and Telecommunications Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:16
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This image 16% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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53% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 25% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 18% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

While Information Media and Telecommunications is a relatively small industry (representing around 1% of employment within Australia), it has a diverse profile and includes businesses such as newspaper and internet publishers, television and radio broadcasting, and telecommunications infrastructure and networks. Employment is mainly located in Sydney and Melbourne, but around one in six jobs are in regional Australia.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Telecommunications Trades Workers 13,300 15,000
Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors 13,100 18,300
Journalists and Other Writers 12,400 27,900
Telecommunications Engineering Professionals 8,300 14,400
Librarians 7,600 15,400
Artistic Directors, and Media Producers and Presenters 7,600 12,900
ICT Managers 6,800 84,400
Software and Applications Programmers 6,100 150,700
Performing Arts Technicians 5,100 17,000
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 5,000 156,500
Gallery, Library and Museum Technicians 4,600 9,100
ICT Sales Assistants 4,100 16,300
General Managers 3,700 76,900
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators 3,700 54,100
Sales Assistants (General) 3,100 586,200
Library Assistants 3,100 6,500
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 3,000 123,000
Sales Representatives 3,000 65,900
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 3,000 88,900
Accountants 2,700 198,100

It is a highly skilled workforce, with more than three quarters having a post-school qualification.

While qualifications are generally mandatory for the more technical roles, employers in some sectors of the industry (for example, publishing and broadcasting) may also see value if you can demonstrate your ability by showcasing a portfolio. Employers value prior experience and a portfolio is a good way to present evidence of your relevant skills and abilities.

Workers in this industry are typically interested in journalism, creative and technical writing, photography, video and music production and backstage production services, as well as computer programming, engineering and related technical and electronic support.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:18
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This image 26% of jobs are regional. 8% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 28% of workers are self-employed.
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34% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

While Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services is a relatively small industry, it has shown some growth over the past few years. Almost 42% of the workforce are Sales Workers, with Real Estate Sales Agents accounting for most of these.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Real Estate Sales Agents 79,800 95,200
General Clerks 10,700 311,200
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 8,900 76,800
Land Economists and Valuers 8,100 10,500
Office Managers 6,000 115,900
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 5,500 156,500
Accounting Clerks 5,300 144,100
Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons 4,700 15,900
Accountants 4,100 198,100
Receptionists 4,000 164,500
Bookkeepers 3,000 97,100
Personal Assistants 2,700 50,600
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 2,500 123,000
Metal Fitters and Machinists 2,400 106,000
Construction Managers 2,300 116,700
Commercial Cleaners 2,100 167,000
Handypersons 1,800 46,700
Motor Mechanics 1,700 106,600
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers 1,600 52,100
Secretaries 1,600 29,400

In response to the economic impact of COVID-19, many businesses across all industries accelerated adoption of new technologies (working from home, video conferencing etc). Businesses within Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services are the most likely to have introduced new technologies into their workplaces (51%), likely driven by new leasing and inspection procedures.

Workers in this industry generally have a broad range of qualifications, indicating that employment opportunities exist for people of all skill levels and qualifications. Work is commonly full-time (74%) and employment is evenly split along gender lines.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Jobs by Occupation

Jobs by Occupation Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:36
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Jobs by Occupation infographic page.  Managers. 1 in 4 are aged 55 years or old and the top employing occupations are Retail Managers; Advertising, Publication Relations and Sales Managers; and Construction Managers. Professionals. 3 out of 4 hold a bachelor degree or higher qualification and the top employing occupations are Registered Nurses; Accountants; and Primary School Teachers. Technicians and Trades Workers. 83% are employed full-time and the top employing occupations are Electricians

Managers

Managers Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:37
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Graphic shows image 33% of jobs are regional. 3% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 33% of workers are self-employed.
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Graphic shows image 40% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 26% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

There are around 1.7 million Australians employed in Manager roles across the country. These occupations can be very diverse and Managers work across many different types of organisations and industries.

Are qualifications or experience needed?

This is a relatively skilled group, as Managers generally hold senior positions, taking responsibility for staff and operations. This means qualifications and experience are usually needed, however, sometimes significant on-the-job experience is sufficient.

  • The majority of Managers hold post-school qualifications, although this is less common for Farmers and Farm Managers and Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers.
  • The need for workplace experience is reflected in the age profile of the workforce. More than half of all Managers are aged 45 years or older. Just 3% are aged 15 to 24 years, although there are more opportunities for young people in Hospitality, Retail and Service Manager roles (accounting for 7% of this group).

Managers are typically skilled in communication and building relationships, planning, budgeting and problem solving.

Top employing occupations

  This industry
Retail Managers 262,500
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 156,500
Construction Managers 116,700
Livestock Farmers 90,600
ICT Managers 84,400
General Managers 76,900
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 76,800
Human Resource Managers 72,000
Finance Managers 68,700
Cafe and Restaurant Managers 65,500
Production Managers 61,500
Chief Executives and Managing Directors 57,200
Other Specialist Managers 52,200
Corporate Services Managers 48,200
Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers 46,100
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers 41,800
Crop Farmers 40,800
Policy and Planning Managers 33,000
Health and Welfare Services Managers 32,900
Conference and Event Organisers 28,700

In which industries do managers work?

Managers work in every industry, but the largest shares are in Retail Trade and Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing (12% and 11% respectively). Other major employing industries include Manufacturing (9%), Construction (9%) and Accommodation and Food Services (8%).

Some Manager occupations are concentrated in specific industries. For example, Café and Restaurant Managers are mainly employed in Accommodation and Food Services. For other Manager occupations, such as General Managers and Human Resource Managers, employment is spread across all industries.

Are there job opportunities?

When looking for Manager vacancies, remember they are not always advertised online. Some positions are filled by the promotion of existing workers, while others are advertised in less formal ways such as word-of-mouth or head hunting. It is important for job seekers who are looking for Manager positions to remember this and use professional networks to help bolster their recruitment chances.

Within this occupation group, the National Skills Commission’s 2021 Skills Priority List identified skills shortages for around 12% of all Manager occupations. Some key Manager occupations which are both in shortage and have strong projected national future demand include Quality Assurance Manager and ICT Project Manager.

Will there be future opportunities?

Mangers often perform a range of non-routine, cognitive duties (such as problem solving) so this occupation group is less susceptible to automation.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Managers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Chief Executives, General Managers and Legislators 133.2 11.7 9.6 11 32 0 30 54 15 18 -5.9
Farmers and Farm Managers 165.6 3.3 2.0 26 29 2 57 18 30 44 1.7
Specialist Managers 902.8 197.3 28.0 11 37 2 22 51 29 17 10.3
Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 552.2 56.3 11.4 21 46 7 23 25 33 37 1.9
All Managers 1,743.4 209.8 13.7 15 39 3 26 40 30 26 6.1

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employment Projections; National Skills Commission, Employers’ Recruitment Insights; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021.

Professionals

Professionals Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 11:00
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The Professionals graphic shows image 23% of jobs are regional. 6% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 14% of workers are self-employed.
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78% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 13% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 2% of workers hold an other qualification. 7% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Professionals is the largest employing occupation group in Australia (accounting for one in every four workers).

There are clear differences in the representation of men and women across occupations in the Professionals group. Around 75% of Health Professionals and 72% of Education Professionals are female, but 79% of ICT Professionals are male. The extent of part-time employment also varies, being relatively rare for ICT Professionals but more common for Arts and Media Professionals, Health Professionals, and Education Professionals.

Are qualifications or experience needed?

Most Professional jobs require a bachelor degree or higher qualification (78% of Professionals have this level of qualification), so university study is the main pathway for employment. Reflecting the time it takes to gain relevant qualifications, a relatively small proportion of Professionals are aged 15 to 24 years (only 6%).

In addition to qualifications, skills that are often required to be a Professional include communication, planning, project management, problem solving, writing and research.

Top employing occupations

Registered Nurses 309,100
Accountants 198,100
Primary School Teachers 178,900
Software and Applications Programmers 150,700
Secondary School Teachers 121,000
Management and Organisation Analysts 101,500
Solicitors 96,600
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 88,900
Human Resource Professionals 80,400
General Practitioners and Resident Medical Officers 70,200
University Lecturers and Tutors 60,400
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators 54,100
Civil Engineering Professionals 53,000
Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists 52,800
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers 52,100
Private Tutors and Teachers 51,900
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers 51,100
Other Information and Organisation Professionals 49,000
Architects and Landscape Architects 46,400
Pharmacists 42,600

Are there job opportunities?

There will continue to be job opportunities for Professionals. Along with the rising demand for these workers, the supply of university educated Australians is also increasing, with higher education enrolments increasing significantly over the past decade. With more university graduates, and more people searching for work, there are now large numbers of qualified applicants competing for some Professional occupations.

With increased competition, job seekers are encouraged to be as flexible as possible with their availability and highlight their transferable skills and experience. Employers will be looking for reliable and flexible workers, with good communication skills who can learn new tasks quickly and adapt to new working environments. If you can, give examples from your work history which highlight these skills and can help you stand out from the crowd.

Within this occupation group, the National Skills Commission’s 2021 Skills Priority List identifies skills shortages for around 19% of all Professional occupations. Accountant, Developer Programmer and Software Engineer are all large employing occupations which are in shortage and have strong projected future demand

In which industries do Professionals work?

Around two-thirds of Professionals are employed in just three industries: Health Care and Social Assistance (23% of Professional employment), Professional, Scientific and Technical Services (22%) and Education and Training (21%).

Employment by occupation subgroup, Professionals

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Arts and Media Professionals 121.5 19.5 19.1 40 55 10 19 55 20 24 4.2
Business, Human Resource and Marketing Professionals 841.3 171.4 25.6 18 50 5 16 73 15 10 9.5
Design, Engineering, Science and Transport Professionals 494.3 103.2 26.4 17 33 8 15 76 15 7 12.1
Education Professionals 640.8 114.1 21.7 35 72 8 22 84 9 5 8.7
Health Professionals 703.4 142.2 25.3 38 75 6 20 85 10 2 15.2
ICT Professionals 344.6 92.5 36.7 8 21 5 10 70 16 11 26.6
Legal, Social and Welfare Professionals 284.0 72.7 34.4 29 67 4 21 82 12 5 17.5
All Professionals 3,415.5 681.1 24.9 26 55 6 18 78 13 7 13.2

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employment Projections; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021. 

Technicians and Trades Workers

Technicians and Trades Workers Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 16:16
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The Technicians and Trades Workers graphic shows image 35% of jobs are regional. 16% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 24% of workers are self-employed.
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11% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 57% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 25% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Technicians and Trades Workers undertake a variety of skilled manual tasks. They apply technical, trade or industry specific knowledge in construction, manufacturing, scientific, engineering and other activities.

Regional employment is fairly common with more than a third of workers employed across regional Australia.

A relatively large proportion of this group are self-employed (24%), particularly Construction Trades Workers (43%), and full-time work is common.

Technicians and Trades Workers has the second lowest percentage of female workers of any occupation group (16%). This is especially apparent for Automotive and Engineering Trades Workers, Construction Trades Workers, and Electrotechnology and Telecommunications Trades Workers with women representing less than 3% of these workforces. That said, some occupations have large shares of female workers, such as Veterinary Nurses (95%) and Hairdressers (81%).

What qualifications and skills are needed?

Around 60% of Technicians and Trades Workers hold a certificate III or higher vocational qualification, with apprenticeships and traineeships providing a key training pathway for many occupations in this group.

Top employing occupations

Electricians 175,900
Carpenters and Joiners 143,100
Motor Mechanics 106,600
Metal Fitters and Machinists 106,000
Chefs 91,200
Plumbers 84,600
Gardeners 83,000
Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians 78,200
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers 77,500
Hairdressers 65,100
ICT Support Technicians 61,100
Painting Trades Workers 44,400
Cooks 43,600
Bakers and Pastrycooks 39,600
Other Building and Engineering Technicians 35,100
Medical Technicians 33,800
Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics 28,500
Cabinetmakers 25,700
Bricklayers and Stonemasons 24,100
Electronics Trades Workers 24,100

In which industries are Technicians and Trades Workers employed?

Construction accounts for the largest share of these workers (32%), followed by Manufacturing (13%) and Other Services (which includes automotive repair and maintenance) (13%).

Are there job opportunities?

With federal and state governments introducing or bringing forward infrastructure projects, the Construction industry (and therefore Technician and Trades Workers) will remain an important source of jobs for Australians now and into the future.

Many vacancies for Technicians and Trades Workers can be advertised informally. When seeking work in this occupation, it pays to be proactive by approaching employers directly (e.g. by email or by phone), checking social media (including jobs groups on Facebook), and reaching out through your network of family and friends.

Analysis by the National Skills Commission in the 2021 Skills Priority List indicated shortages are most common in the Technicians and Trades Workers occupation group, with 42% of assessed occupations in shortage. Electrician, Chef and Metal Fabricator are all large employing occupations which are in shortage and have strong projected future demand.

Will there be future opportunities?

Demand is likely to be ongoing for Technicians and Trades Workers. Given their role within the economy, there will always be demand for those workers who can build, construct, fix and mend. While there may be the risk of automation for some routine tasks, many occupations involve non-routine or unpredictable duties which are more difficult to automate.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Technicians and Trades Workers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Engineering, ICT and Science Technicians 278.8 45.8 19.7 16 26 7 16 31 47 17 11.2
Automotive and Engineering Trades Workers 356.8 20.6 6.1 8 1 15 19 3 66 21 0.2
Construction Trades Workers 368.4 -13.8 -3.6 11 2 21 14 3 60 29 4.1
Electrotechnology and Telecommunications Trades Workers 250.5 13.2 5.6 8 2 18 14 8 63 23 6.9
Food Trades Workers 196.6 38.6 24.5 34 35 15 16 15 47 32 9.9
Skilled Animal and Horticultural Workers 139.9 23.9 20.6 35 33 17 23 13 45 34 7.2
Other Technicians and Trades Workers 192.7 9.2 5.0 32 46 17 18 12 58 24 0.7
All Technicians and Trades Workers 1,783.4 125.8 7.6 17 16 16 17 11 57 25 5.4

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employment Projections; National Skills Commission, Employers’ Recruitment Insights; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021.

Community and Personal Service Workers

Community and Personal Service Workers Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 16:22
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The Community and Personal Service Workers graphic shows image 35% of jobs are regional. 23% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 9% of workers are self-employed.
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23% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 47% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 25% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Community and Personal Service Workers provide a wide range of services, including in the areas of aged and disability care, health and social welfare, child care, hospitality, policing, tourism and sports. Employment is largely concentrated in two industries, with 40% employed in Health Care and Social Assistance and 18% in Accommodation and Food Services.

Workers are mainly female (69%) and part-time employment is common (55%), although there are differences by subgroup. For example, Protective Service Workers (which includes Police, Fire and Emergency Workers and Security Officers and Guards) is largely a male workforce (77%) and has a relatively low level of part-time employment (13%).

Are qualifications needed?

Entry pathways are varied, reflecting the diverse range of services provided by workers in this group. Around 47% of workers have a certificate III or higher vocational qualification, 25% do not hold a post-school qualification and 23% have a bachelor degree or higher.

Health and Welfare Support Workers (which includes Ambulance Officers and Paramedics and Dental Hygienists, Technicians and Therapists) is the most highly educated subgroup, with nearly 90% holding post-school qualifications.

Top employing occupations

Aged and Disabled Carers 240,900
Child Carers 132,500
Waiters 131,700
Education Aides 118,800
Bar Attendants and Baristas 103,400
Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers 92,700
Welfare Support Workers 72,800
Police 70,900
Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials 62,700
Security Officers and Guards 52,500
Fitness Instructors 38,900
Beauty Therapists 38,700
Cafe Workers 33,100
Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses 26,200
Dental Assistants 21,900
Prison Officers 20,400
Fire and Emergency Workers 20,300
Ambulance Officers and Paramedics 16,800
Other Personal Service Workers 16,000
Massage Therapists 15,500

Are there job opportunities?

Some occupations in this group provide good entry level employment opportunities. For example, young workers (aged 15 to 24 years) account for 52% of Hospitality Workers and post-school study is often not needed for these jobs.

For jobs within the heath care sector, check online recruitment websites as they are regularly used by employers. It is important that you also remember to check the websites of big employers, as many will only advertise jobs on their own websites.

Community and Personal Service Worker occupations are the least likely to be in shortage according to analysis by the National Skills Commission. In the 2021 Skills Priority List, 8% of assessed occupations in this group are in shortage (the lowest proportion of all assessed occupation groups). Despite this, Enrolled Nurse, Child Care Worker and Aged or Disabled Carer are in shortage and have strong projected future demand.

Will there be future opportunities?

Jobs in this group typically require skills that are less likely to be automated (such as interpersonal and communication skills). With most of the workers in this occupation employed in Health Care and Social Assistance, future demand is expected to be driven by population growth, an ageing population and the continued expansion of the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

Employment by occupation subgroup, Community and Personal Service Workers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Health and Welfare Support Workers 147.8 7.1 5.0 43 74 7 22 34 50 11 13.9
Carers and Aides 616.1 90.4 17.2 61 83 16 21 21 54 21 15.9
Hospitality Workers 299.1 22.7 8.2 70 67 52 6 20 23 53 22.9
Protective Service Workers 161.5 17.3 12.0 13 23 6 17 25 46 19 6.3
Sports and Personal Service Workers 210.3 16.6 8.5 63 62 26 14 25 41 30 6.6
All Community and Personal Service Workers 1,431.4 146.4 11.4 55 69 23 17 23 47 25 14.6

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers' Recruitment Insights; National Skills Commission, Employment Projections; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021. 

Clerical and Administrative Workers

Clerical and Administrative Workers Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 16:28
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The Clerical and Administrative Workers graphic shows image 28% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years.
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11% of workers are self-employed. 28% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 36% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Clerical and Administrative Workers provide support to businesses by organising, storing, manipulating and retrieving information. Employment is spread widely across industries but most jobs are likely to be office-based.

There are opportunities in this group for workers who do not hold post-school qualifications, with more than a third of this group not having completed further study.

Top employing occupations

General Clerks 311,200
Receptionists 164,500
Accounting Clerks 144,100
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 123,000
Office Managers 115,900
Bookkeepers 97,100
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 94,000
Information Officers 88,300
Keyboard Operators 53,700
Personal Assistants 50,600
Couriers and Postal Deliverers 47,300
Bank Workers 44,800
Payroll Clerks 41,700
Transport and Despatch Clerks 35,500
Call or Contact Centre Workers 33,600
Inspectors and Regulatory Officers 33,600
Credit and Loans Officers 31,000
Insurance, Money Market and Statistical Clerks 30,700
Secretaries 29,400
Practice Managers 27,400

This workforce is mainly female, with women accounting for 74% of these workers. Within this group, though, there is some variation with women making up 96% of Personal Assistants and Secretaries but only 37% of Clerical and Office Support Workers. The age profile of this occupation is relatively old, with close to a quarter of workers aged 55 years or older.

Competition for these positions can be fierce, with employers recruiting for Clerical and Administration Workers typically receiving the highest number of applicants per vacancy of all the occupation groups.

Despite the National Skills Commission determining no assessed Clerical or Administrative Workers occupations are in shortage though the 2021 Skills Priority List, strong projected future demand is anticipated for a number of occupations in this group, including Medical Receptionist, General Receptionist, General Clerk and Program or Project Administrator.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Clerical or Administrative Workers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Office Managers and Program Administrators 270.2 -30.4 -10.1 27 68 4 22 36 31 29 8.2
Personal Assistants and Secretaries 80.4 -16.3 -16.8 36 96 8 26 20 38 31 -16.6
General Clerical Workers 356.4 35.8 11.2 40 84 12 23 26 30 38 9.3
Inquiry Clerks and Receptionists 286.3 4.8 1.7 45 84 20 21 22 31 40 3.6
Numerical Clerks 383.2 12.3 3.3 40 79 7 25 34 28 32 0.6
Clerical and Office Support Workers 91.8 -7.2 -7.2 32 37 12 31 17 21 61 -4.7
Other Clerical and Administrative Workers 239.6 -0.2 -0.1 20 50 9 18 25 29 38 3.1
All Clerical and Administrative Workers 1,715.7 4.0 0.2 35 74 10 23 28 30 36 3.5

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers’ Insights on the Australian Labour Market: 2020 Data Report; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021.

Sales Workers

Sales Workers Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 16:37
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The Sales Workers graphic shows image 32% of jobs are regional. 40% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 9% of workers are self-employed.
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19% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 22% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 53% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Sales Workers sell goods, services and property, and provide sales support. A large share of these workers is employed in Retail Trade (62%).

Few jobs in this group require post-school qualifications and the workforce is relatively young (40% are aged 15 to 24 years).

Top employing occupations

Sales Assistants (General) 586,200
Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers 142,100
Real Estate Sales Agents 95,200
Sales Representatives 65,900
Retail Supervisors 44,400
Pharmacy Sales Assistants 38,200
Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons 27,800
ICT Sales Assistants 16,300
Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons 15,900
Insurance Agents 15,800
Ticket Salespersons 11,600
Retail and Wool Buyers 10,700
Service Station Attendants 9,600
Visual Merchandisers 8,500
Street Vendors and Related Salespersons 6,900
Models and Sales Demonstrators 5,900
Telemarketers 4,200
Auctioneers, and Stock and Station Agents 4,000
Other Sales Support Workers 4,000

These jobs are often people’s first employment and the seven day a week trading hours of many retail stores create part-time employment opportunities for students (58% of jobs are part-time).

Jobs are often advertised through informal methods, while some vacancies are filled through applicants approaching employers for work. Research by the National Skills Commission (NSC) indicates that for employers recruiting Sales Workers around 28% advertise by word-of-mouth, 16% use social media and 12% are approached directly by a job seeker.

The NSC's 2021 Skills Priority List anticipates strong projected future demand for the following Sales Worker occupations: Pharmacy Sales Assistant, Insurance Agent and Motor Vehicle or Caravan Salesperson.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Sales Workers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Sales Representatives and Agents 182.9 -20.2 -9.9 17 42 7 22 34 33 28 2.7
Sales Assistants and Salespersons 765.1 -0.1 0.0 64 60 45 13 15 21 58 1.9
Sales Support Workers 189.7 11.4 6.4 76 71 52 11 15 16 62 1.9
All Sales Workers 1,101.3 -39.1 -3.4 58 59 40 14 19 22 53 2.0

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Employers’ Insights on the Australian Labour Market: 2020 Data Report; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021.

Machinery Operators and Drivers

Machinery Operators and Drivers Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 16:41
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The Machinery Operators and Drivers graphic shows image 35% of jobs are regional. 11% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 14% of workers are self-employed.
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11% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 31% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 51% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Machinery Operators and Drivers operate machines, vehicles and are mainly employed in Transport, Postal and Warehousing, Manufacturing and Construction. More than one third of workers are employed in regional Australia.

The National Skills Commission's 2021 Skills Priority List anticipates strong projected future demand for the following Machinery Operators and Driver occupations: Truck Driver, Storeperson and Agricultural and Horticultural Mobile Plant Operator.

Top employing occupations

Truck Drivers 160,500
Storepersons 137,900
Delivery Drivers 74,900
Forklift Drivers 61,400
Drillers, Miners and Shot Firers 57,100
Automobile Drivers 48,600
Bus and Coach Drivers 47,900
Earthmoving Plant Operators 47,600
Other Stationary Plant Operators 20,100
Other Mobile Plant Operators 16,100
Crane, Hoist and Lift Operators 15,100
Engineering Production Workers 14,600
Agricultural, Forestry and Horticultural Plant Operators 12,500
Other Machine Operators 12,300
Sewing Machinists 11,200
Train and Tram Drivers 11,100
Industrial Spraypainters 7,900
Paper and Wood Processing Machine Operators 7,200
Plastics and Rubber Production Machine Operators 4,200
Clay, Concrete, Glass and Stone Processing Machine Operators 3,200

Post-school qualifications are often not essential to gain employment in this group, but tickets or licences are mandatory for many positions. Employers value skills such as communication, teamwork, problem solving, creativity and initiative. If you are considering working in this area, it may pay to look beyond vacancy websites. Around one in five employers use social media when hiring Machinery Operators and Drivers and it is not uncommon for positions to be advertised through word-of-mouth or by recruitment agencies.

This occupation group is mostly male (89% of the workforce). Within this group though, there is some variation, with females accounting for one in five people employed as Storepersons.

Employment by occupation subgroup, Machinery Operators and Drivers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Machine and Stationary Plant Operators 166.3 -4.3 -2.5 10 16 8 23 6 39 48 1.7
Mobile Plant Operators 140.7 20.3 16.9 10 4 8 27 6 31 53 -0.1
Road and Rail Drivers 353.4 4.8 1.4 24 6 8 33 13 29 51 7.9
Storepersons 137.9 17.1 14.2 27 22 23 17 16 22 55 2.7
All Machinery Operators and Drivers 790.4 28.7 3.8 19 11 11 27 11 31 51 4.4

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences; National Skills Commission, Employers’ Insights on the Australian Labour Market: 2020 Data Report; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021. 

Labourers

Labourers Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 16:48
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The Labourers graphic shows image 40% of jobs are regional. 26% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 15% of workers are self-employed.
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10% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 24% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 59% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual employment growth

Labourers perform a variety of routine and repetitive physical tasks. Some Labourer jobs require physical fitness (like Building and Plumbing Labourers) but not all involve heavy work (for example, Fast Food Cooks).

Jobs in this group are often advertised informally, with many being filled by applicants approaching the employer directly.

Most Labourer positions do not generally require post-school qualifications, a large share of workers are aged 15 to 24 years and part-time work is common. Accordingly, there are good opportunities for young people to gain work experience or combine work with study. There are also opportunities for workers across Australia, with 40% of Labourers employed in regional areas.

Top employing occupations

Commercial Cleaners 167,000
Kitchenhands 138,800
Packers 71,300
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 70,500
Shelf Fillers 65,000
Building and Plumbing Labourers 63,200
Handypersons 46,700
Fast Food Cooks 44,500
Domestic Cleaners 39,500
Garden and Nursery Labourers 35,500
Concreters 31,500
Food and Drink Factory Workers 29,900
Housekeepers 28,100
Livestock Farm Workers 27,200
Crop Farm Workers 24,900
Insulation and Home Improvement Installers 22,600
Structural Steel Construction Workers 22,600
Product Assemblers 22,200
Car Detailers 19,000
Meat, Poultry and Seafood Process Workers 17,100

While formal qualifications are not necessarily a requirement for these roles, some may require mandatory tickets or licences. In addition, job seekers will generally need to possess a driver licence and their own transport.

Almost a third of employers who recruit for Labourers use word-of-mouth. If you are looking for work in these occupations, consider speaking to friends, family and your broader network about opportunities. There has also been a large increase in the proportion of employers using social media when hiring Labourers (from 12% of employers in 2019 to 21% in 2020).

Employment by occupation subgroup, Labourers

  Employment Employment Profile Workforce Educational Profile Projected Employment
  Employ’t May 2021 5 year change
to May 2021
Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual 5 year change to May 2025
Occupation subgroup ‘000 ‘000 % % % % % % % % %
Cleaners and Laundry Workers 280.2 11.3 4.2 66 58 13 28 14 23 57 4.4
Construction and Mining Labourers 170.1 4.0 2.4 15 3 18 14 5 36 50 4.9
Factory Process Workers 194.2 5.0 2.6 26 36 18 19 14 19 60 1.2
Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers 110.0 -11.5 -9.4 35 28 23 22 5 29 55 2.1
Food Preparation Assistants 190.5 18.5 10.8 82 52 60 10 9 13 74 8.6
Other Labourers 233.9 33.8 16.9 50 23 27 25 7 23 58 4.6
All Labourers 1,181.9 59.4 5.3 48 35 26 20 10 24 59 4.4

Sources: ABS, Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); National Skills Commission, Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences; National Skills Commission, Employers’ Insights on the Australian Labour Market: 2020 Data Report; National Skills Commission, Skills Priority List, 2021.

Emerging Occupations

Emerging Occupations Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:21

What are emerging occupations?

Emerging occupations are defined as new, frequently advertised jobs which are substantially different to occupations already defined in the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO). The National Skills Commission has identified and validated 25 emerging occupations within seven categories in the Australian labour market.

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Emerging occupations arise as we adapt to new challenges and opportunities over time. Previously, new skills have been adapted more gradually. Recently, the need to adapt and learn new skills has arisen quite quickly in response to COVID-19. Manufacturers have learnt new techniques to make unfamiliar and in-demand products, and restaurant owners have quickly developed or enhanced their skills in e-commerce.

There are some instances where the skills required for certain jobs can change without changing the occupation fundamentally. For example, advances in the way we store and organise information mean we can more easily access a wider range of knowledge than in previous decades. As a result, librarians spend less time dealing with the physical management and transport of information, and more time assisting people to understand how to access, understand and use that information.

In the case of statisticians, however, emerging skills have changed the nature of some traditional statistician roles enough that the new occupations of Data Scientists and Data Analysts have emerged. You can learn more about how we defined and identified our emerging occupations, as well as see the profiles for all 25 emerging occupations on the NSC website (nationalskillscommission.gov.au/emerging-occupations).

Emerging occupations profiles

Emerging occupations profiles Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 11:05

Solar Installers

Solar Installers assemble, install, or maintain solar photovoltaic systems on roofs or other structures in compliance with site assessment and schematics. This may include measuring, cutting, assembling, and bolting structural framing and solar modules. Solar Installers may perform minor electrical work such as current checks.

Their main tasks include installing solar systems, repair and maintenance of solar electrical systems, and estimating work requirements for quotes. The number of persons employed in this occupation grew from 1,900 in 2015 to 5,740 in 2019. Solar Installers earn a median weekly wage of $1,200 and 50% have a certificate III or IV level qualification.

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Solar installers. 6% female. 42 average hours worked per week. 80% employed full-time. 33 average age.

 

Nurse Liaisons

Nurse Liaisons foster the relationship between patients and the facilities providing their care. Nurse Liaisons establish patients’ eligibility for care, communicate with families, and interact with a wide range of staff members, from admissions coordinators to case managers to physicians. They work in acute care, long-term care, hospice and rehabilitation environments.

Their main tasks include arranging care for patients, assisting patients in appointments, liaising with health care staff for patient health matters, ensuring consumer rights, and following up on insurance claims for patients.

The number of persons employed in this occupation grew from 1,950 in 2015 to 2,820 in 2019. Nurse Liaisons earn a median weekly wage of $1,870 and 41% have no post-school qualifications.

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Nurse Liaisons. 92% female. 31 average hours worked per week. 75% employed full-time. 48 average age.

 

Data Scientists

Data Scientists find, manage and interpret rich data sources. They build mathematical models, present and communicate data insights and findings, and recommend ways to apply data.

Their main tasks include developing machine learning models, data mining, data analytics, visualisation, reporting and consultation.

The number of persons employed in this occupation grew from 450 in 2015 to 3,210 in 2019. Data Scientists earn a median weekly wage of $2,040 and 89% have a bachelor degree or higher qualification.

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Data Scientists. 32% female. 39 average hours worked per week. 92% employed full-time. 37 average age.

Labour Market Insights

Labour Market Insights Alexander Vilagosh Fri, 09/24/2021 - 14:01

Where do you look for a job?

Where do you look for a job? Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 11:12

Finding a job

The first step on the road to employment is to find out what jobs are available. But where are jobs listed? Employers often use a number of methods to find candidates and below are some of the most common methods used.

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What employers are looking for

What employers are looking for Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 11:13

As the jobs market recovers from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is more important than ever to understand what employers are looking for. From January to June 2021, employers who had recruited in the previous month received an average of 14 applicants for every vacancy advertised online.

Generally, employers are looking for someone with the whole package: the right qualifications are typically essential and work experience is often a pre-requisite. Also, do not forget your employability skills! National Skills Commission (NSC) data suggests that employers may be willing to compromise on some things, depending on the type of job, but not on others. For example, an employer may hire someone as a Checkout Operator without any work experience but will insist on good teamwork and communication skills.

Education and training

Overall, work is becoming more highly skilled. Most jobs in the future will require a Vocational Education and Training (VET) or university qualification. In 2020, over two-thirds of Australians aged 20-64 years (69% or 10.4 million people) had a non-school qualification (a certificate, diploma, or degree). This has increased from 57% or 6.7 million people in 2005.

Completing Year 12 (or equivalent) is the minimum requirement for most employers, however, many are seeking people with post-school qualifications.

University is not the only pathway to a good job. Apprenticeships, traineeships, diplomas, or certificate III or IV level qualifications will also set you up for a stable and rewarding career. If you are considering a VET course or qualification, the best type of training is related to the job you want to do. But don’t do training for the sake of it! For example, Personal Carers often require certificates in food handling and first aid, but one certificate I (or several) may not help in the long-term. A certificate III or higher qualification will likely include the relevant training, along with a range of other units of competency that are important for this occupation.

In response to COVID-19, new short courses or ‘micro-credentials’, are also available to help you upskill (check out courseseeker.edu.au to search and compare available courses). These short courses can be a good way to gain new skills relevant to the jobs in demand.

Experience

Workplace experience is another important quality highlighted in the results of the NSC’s employer surveys. All jobs will give you valuable experience and help you develop vital employability skills. Regardless of the job, you will gain an understanding of what is expected in the workplace and be able to demonstrate to employers that you are committed to work, reliable and trustworthy. Most importantly, it gives you a foot in the door and provides you with an opportunity to build your network and gain referees.

Experience can be gained through part-time, casual, or temporary jobs, work experience placements, internships or even by volunteering.

What if you do not have any work experience?

If you don’t have any work experience, think about other ways to demonstrate your skills that could be relevant. NSC employer survey findings indicate you could provide examples from your school activities or work on group projects, working with your local sports club, even participating in debating, theatre or dance performances or chess competitions. Employers are also very encouraged by young people who participate in the community or volunteering activities.

There are also some jobs for which employers are more likely to consider someone without previous experience, such as Fast Food Cooks, Packers and Pharmacy Sales Assistants. Research conducted by the NSC indicated these jobs, along with General Sales Assistants and Checkout Operators, are routinely in demand.

Sources: ABS, Education and Work, Australia, May 2020; National Skills Commission, Recruitment Experiences and Outlook Survey, weighted data, 2021; National Skills Commission, Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences, 2018.

What you offer

What you offer Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 11:20

Core competencies

Core competencies are the basic building blocks common across most occupations and industries. They describe a set of non-specialist skills gained in early life and schooling and provide a base to further develop skills and specialties. Popular terms for these include ‘foundation skills’, ‘common skills’, ‘soft skills’, ‘core skills’ and ‘employability skills’.

Employers often place a high value on these as they want someone who will be a good fit for their business. While you can gain these skills through work experience, they are not job-specific, cover a range of personal qualities and skills, and transfer across different occupations and industries.

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Box infographic displaying the following text. Teamwork. Initiative and innovation. Digital literacy. Reading. Writing. Planning and organising. Oral communication. Problem solving. Learning. Numeracy.
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Box infographic with the following text. 21st century skills. Creativity, presenting skills, critical thinking, financial literacy.

Research by the NSC highlights the importance of these skills, showing that three quarters of employers consider personal qualities at least as important as, if not more than, technical skills.

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Pie chart. 25% of employers say technical skills are more important. 38% of employers say personal qualities are more important. 37% of employers say they are equally important.

Even though all employers are unique and place emphasis on different attributes, they will typically not compromise on employability skills specific to their job requirements. Feedback from employers shows that they can teach someone to use a machine, for example, but they cannot teach someone to be reliable or have good communications skills.

You need an excellent résumé and job application

Your résumé and application are often your first chance to market yourself to potential employers.

To improve your chances of reaching the next stage in the recruitment process, your application will need to stand out.

How do you do this?

  • Research the business and job. This will help you tailor your application and show your interest in the position.
  • Ring the employer and ask questions about the job and the business. This will help you understand the position and also demonstrates your enthusiasm and means the employer may remember you and look out for your application.
  • Be succinct. Your application and résumé should be around 1-2 pages each.
  • If possible, include examples from your current job, work history or extracurricular activities and explain how these directly relate to the position on offer.
  • Double and triple-check that there are no spelling or grammatical errors in your application.

Tailor your application to each job

Every job and business is different, so write your application specifically for each job. Do not fall into the trap of using generic applications: imagine what an employer would think if they receive an application suited to a role as a sales representative when their position is for an apprentice refrigeration mechanic.

Employers want the right match for their business and showing that you have read the job description carefully and researched their organisation will help set you apart from other candidates.

More advice on writing résumés and job applications can be found at jobsearch.gov.au.

Digital job applications

Applying for a job has changed – the COVID-19 pandemic has seen employers and businesses implement new technologies in their recruitment practices. Video interviews have become the norm and, with flexible working arrangements, you can apply for jobs outside of your immediate location.

Here are some tips that may help you land a job online:

  • make sure you read all instructions carefully, so you don’t miss any steps
  • check that all information and responses for online applications are well thought out and don’t have any spelling or grammatical mistakes
  • make your résumé software friendly by using a simple format and clearly addressing any selection criteria
  • some employers will do an online search for your name or look at your social media profile, so ensure your digital presence is appropriate
  • be prepared for video interviews – know where to find a good internet connection and professional backdrop and make the most of the time available for each question. Also dress professionally – a good rule is to dress as you would for an interview in-person.

Sources: National Skills Commission, Australian Skills Classification; National Skills Commission, Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences, 2019.

Winning a job

Winning a job Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 11:24

Tell your friends and family you are looking for a job

In 2018, National Skills Commission employer survey findings indicated more than a quarter (27%) of employers filled a job with someone they knew, directly or indirectly. This rose to 39% of employers in regional areas. It is common for employers to hire someone who is:

  • personally known to them, such as a friend or family contact
  • a professional contact (for example, a previous co-worker)
  • recommended by someone they know.

“I’m more likely to employ someone who is not experienced if they come looking for a job… it shows initiative.” Accommodation and Food Services employer

Depending on what job you are looking for and how affected it is by the COVID-19 pandemic, there may not be as many opportunities available at the moment. Telling friends, family contacts, school teachers or neighbours that you are currently looking for work can help improve your chances of hearing about a job opening, or even being recommended for one when an opening occurs. Good old-fashioned knocking on doors can also help – consider dropping off your résumé to businesses in your area. Often employers don’t advertise vacancies at all and instead refer back to these résumés and ring people when an opportunity comes up.

Don’t forget that social media is a perfectly good way to contact people too! However, don’t ask for a job straight away – send a simple message with what you have been doing, that you are looking to start working or move on from your previous job, and ask for some advice or insight. This way, if whoever you tell does become aware of an opportunity, they will be more likely to think of you. But take care! There are scammers who target job seekers online. If the message or email doesn’t look right, or if it sounds too good to be true, delete the message.

Get out there and talk to employers

If you don’t have a wide network of people, or if you have already told people you’re looking for work and haven’t heard anything, don’t be discouraged! Remember that approaching employers directly to ask if they have any positions available can also lead to a job.

From August 2020 to June 2021, for 8% of vacancies, employers considered people who had approached them looking for work, with many employers hiring them. Approaching employers lets you show your communication skills, initiative and motivation – traits that many employers are looking for. This can be a daunting prospect for many, however, make sure you use it as an opportunity to have a conversation and make a lasting impression. This will make you stand out amongst other job seekers who just drop off their résumé. If an employer doesn’t have a job available at the time, but suggests you get in contact again at a later date, make sure you follow up. It shows initiative, that you were listening and are keen. You could just be in the right place at the right time!

Get ready for the interview: Prepare, Plan, Practise and Presentation

The interview is usually the second stage of marketing yourself and landing a job. Interviews can be nerve-wracking, but some preparation beforehand can really help you stand out.

  • Practise interview questions with a friend or family member.
  • Prepare some questions about the job and business to ask at the interview. This demonstrates your interest and shows that you are prepared.
  • Think about your presentation and what you will wear. Remember, first impressions count!
  • Dress appropriately for the job. While formal business attire may be appropriate for a job based in an office, it may not be suitable for a job in the Construction industry.
  • Don’t be late! Find out where you need to be, plan your trip and aim to arrive at least 10 minutes early.
  • Explain the skills that you would bring to the job and talk about your personal and employability skills. Employers want to know who they will be working with and the interview is your opportunity to demonstrate this.
  • Prepare examples to demonstrate your skills and fit with the organisation based on your real-life experiences, such as at a previous job, while studying or volunteering.

What if your approach is not working?

You may need to consider:

  • whether your expectations are realistic – it is unlikely that you will start at the top and you need to show you are willing to work your way up from the bottom
  • widening your search to different types of jobs and locations
  • applying for contract or casual work, part-time or shift work.

Remember that all jobs can open doors to something better and give you valuable experience and skills — don’t just wait to land the perfect job.

“[The job seeker]… asked if we had any jobs going. We didn’t actually need anyone at the time, but she had good qualifications and a good personality so we added her.” Property and Real Estate Services employer

Don’t be afraid to ask for feedback if you are unsuccessful. Many employers will tell you why you didn’t get the job. With each application and interview you gain experience that you can use to improve your job search skills. It is all part of the job search experience.

Looking for a job is hard work. Depending on where you live, there can be a lot of competition for jobs. It can take a while to secure a position and you may receive knockbacks in the process, but if you keep trying, your efforts will pay off.

Remember, while some industries may take time to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, there will be opportunities across many sectors, such as Construction and Health Care and Social Assistance (more information on these industries can be found on pages 15 and 16). COVID-19 may also speed up other trends, such as the move to online shopping. To boost your chances, you need to be flexible and look widely for opportunities – your first job may take you to the warehouse floor, rather than the shop floor!

Sources: National Skills Commission, Recruitment Experiences and Outlook Survey, weighted data, August 2020 to June 2021; National Skills Commission, Survey of Employers’ Recruitment Experiences, 2018.

National Skills Commission

National Skills Commission Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:05

The National Skills Commission (NSC) provides expert advice and national leadership on Australia’s current, emerging and future workforce skills needs. We also play an important role in simplifying and strengthening Australia’s Vocational Education and Training (VET) system.

The NSC researches the jobs market to provide up-to-date information about what’s happening now and into the future. We use data from a wide range of sources, including surveys of employers, and then apply cutting edge data analysis to produce insights. For example, we provide predictions of employment growth by industry, occupation and skills for the next five years, emerging occupations, and also how COVID-19 has impacted jobs in the Australian economy.

The NSC website nationalskillscommission.gov.au will help you understand where the jobs in demand are, and what skills are needed to do those jobs.

Skills Priority List

This annual list provides a detailed view of shortages as well as the strength of future demand (strong, moderate or soft) for nearly 800 occupations at a national, state and territory level. This list is developed after wide consultation with stakeholders. It’s published on the NSC website and will be reviewed and updated every year.

Australian Skills Classification

This interactive interface identifies the range of skills linked to 600 occupations. The skill profiles comprise three elements – core competencies, specialist tasks and technology tools.

The classification also identifies common and transferable skills between occupations, and reveals the connections within, and across, occupations at the level of skills.

Nowcast of Employment by Region and Occupation

The Nowcast of Employment by Region and Occupation (NERO), is a new experimental dataset, developed by the National Skills Commission. It provides timely information on employment in 355 occupations across 88 regions in Australia. Until now, this type of data was only readily available every five years as part of the ABS Census of Population and Housing. With NERO, the insights can be produced monthly, searched either by occupation or region.

And Coming Soon, Labour Market Insights

Later this year, the NSC is launching a new website called Labour Market Insights which brings together the latest jobs market data, research and analysis. You will be able to find insights into employer needs, skills in-demand, and the future outlook for jobs in Australia. This website will bring together the detailed occupation profiles you can find now on the Job Outlook website (joboutlook.gov.au) and the rich store of local labour market data and research on the Labour Market Information Portal (lmip.gov.au).

Skills for the Future

Skills for the Future Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:09

Skills are key

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused large-scale disruption to Australian businesses, workplaces and jobs. Even as the Australian economy recovers, we are likely to see more workforce transitions due to increased digitisation, technological adoption and ongoing structural changes.

In these times of global uncertainty and change, skills are key. In March 2021, the National Skills Commission (NSC) published the very first Australian Skills Classification. The beta version of the Classification is currently available on the NSC website (nationalskillscommission.gov.au/our-work/australian-skills-classification). This release includes 600 occupation profiles highlighting the key skills attached to each job. This new classification contains three categories of skills for each occupation profile:

  • Core competencies: these are skills commonly used in all jobs (sometimes called ‘employability skills’).
  • Specialist tasks: these are the day-to-day work activities within a job.
  • Technology tools: technologies, such as software or hardware, used within a job.

The Classification also includes skills clusters, where similar skills are grouped together. These clusters show the connections and relationships that exist between skills across the labour market.

The Australian Government, through the NSC, provides a range of other job matching tools and resources to help young people and existing workers skill and reskill themselves for jobs and careers that are in demand. More information about these tools can be found at yourcareer.gov.au.

What types of skills will be in demand?

When applying for jobs, remember to emphasise your core competencies (i.e. employability skills), rather than just the technical skills you may have. Oral communication, teamwork, problem solving, and initiative and innovation are required for all jobs, and this will continue to be the case in the future. These skills are also highly valued by employers across all sectors, as they are necessary in every job.

We also know it is important to have the skills that help you work with technology. Almost all jobs will require the use of at least one technology tool. Several technology tools are so universal in 2021 that they are likely to be used by most, if not all jobs. These common technology tools include using the internet, sending emails, texts or instant messages, and video conferencing.

Other technology tools are highly specialised and are specific to a job. For example, the primary task for Truck Drivers is driving a truck but technology tools support drivers to perform other tasks, such as using GPS receivers for more efficient and effective navigation and transportation.

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Infographic occupation profile for Truck Drivers. 7331 Truck Drivers drive heavy trucks, removal vans, tankers and tow trucks to transport bulky goods and liquids. Core Competencies (all scores are out of 10):  4 - Digital engagement, 7 -Planning and organising, 5 – Writing, 5 – Reading, 5 - Oral communication, 4 – Numeracy, 4 – Learning, 5 - Problem solving, 6 - Initiative and innovation, 5 – Teamwork. Technology Tools: Enterprise resource planning ERP software, GPS receivers. Specialist Tasks: Operate veh

Can skills gained in one job be transferred to another job?

Many jobs have a similar set of skills. If you are looking for work or needing to change jobs, the good news is that you are likely to have many transferable skills. Identifying your transferable skills can open a broad range of job opportunities. The Australian Skills Classification can improve job matching by linking the skills required in one job to another. The Classification identifies the work activities or specialist tasks a person undertakes specific to a job. You can use the specialist tasks in the Classification to describe your full range of skills including relevant skills picked up through work experience, formal education and on-the-job training. Occupation profiles also provide a clearer understanding of employers’ skill needs and the transferable skills you may have.

Will training and qualifications be necessary?

There are many pathways to work, and it is important to make decisions based on your own strengths. In a competitive labour market, training and qualifications matter. It also helps to understand the skills you acquire through your education, training and work experience. You can use the Government’s resources like Your Career, Skills Match and Jobs Hub to identify your transferable skills and address skills gaps. These resources also identify local labour market trends and opportunities — so you know your training and qualifications will lead to ongoing work. Skills development and lifelong learning will expand your opportunities as some jobs change, new jobs emerge, and technological progress continues. For more information see yourcareer.gov.au.

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Jobs with similar skills to cafe workers include baristas, waiters, bar attendants, kitchenhands and cashiers.  Jobs with similar skills to general clerks include receptionists, admissions clerks, data entry operators and transport/despatch clerks.  Jobs with similar skills to sales assistants include motor vehicle salespersons, customer service managers and call centre operators.  Jobs with similar skills to builder's labourers include wall and floor tilers, railway track workers and freight handlers.

National Careers Institute

National Careers Institute Alexander Vilagosh Fri, 09/24/2021 - 14:05

School Leavers Information Kit

School Leavers Information Kit Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:14

Are you getting ready to leave school? Are you aged between 15 to 24? Support is here.

Life after school can be full of exciting opportunities. You might discover new passions, develop valuable skills or learn more about what you want out of life.

The School Leavers Information Kit (SLIK) can help you figure out where you’re heading and can help you get ready for life after school. The SLIK can help you discover the next steps for your education, training and work. Download a free copy of the School Leavers Information Kit at yourcareer.gov.au/schoolleaver.

With all the options out there, you might still be deciding what to do next. We know the transition from school into work, study or training can sometimes be challenging, and COVID-19 has presented some additional uncertainty. You might want to talk through your options with someone. You can chat or text a real person who can answer your questions and provide support.

Call 1800 CAREER (1800 227 337), text SLIS2021 to 0429 009 435 or email schoolleavers.nci@dese.gov.au for personalised support. You can book a free 45 minute career guidance session with a qualified career practitioner to get some help.

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Infographic. Emily wants to use 2021 to focus on building her future career. She has a lot of options in mind, but she needs some help deciding between them. If Emily sounds like you, there is a Help to build your future career section in the SLIK. You can also explore opportunities close to home in the Localised information section. This can help you decide on your next move. Raj isn’t sure what he wants to do next year. He had been thinking about taking a gap year, but now he’s reconsidering. He’s looking

Identify your skills!

No matter what option you pursue, don’t forget that you already have a range of employability skills that can help you. Employability skills - like communication and teamwork - are important in all education, training and work pathways.

The SLIK includes information about how you can characterise your employability skills by drawing on your experiences. It shows you how you can build these skills into your résumé, or education and training applications, to set you apart from the crowd. The SLIK also shows how you can apply your skills within a range of different industries.

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Infographic. Organisational skills - "For my part-time job as a supermarket attendant, I always attended my shifts on time, had good time management, could be relied upon to meet deadlines and wasn't distracted by my phone.” Digital capabilities - "At school I learnt how to use Microsoft Word, Outlook, PowerPoint and Excel. I understand how to do basic tasks using all these tools and am eager to learn more." Communication and social skills - "Volunteering at the local animal shelter, I developed clear and p

Plus, there is information about:

  • further education and training
  • different industries across Australia
  • gap years, volunteering, working harvest jobs in regional Australia or starting your own business
  • applying for jobs.

And, tailored information, no matter your location or circumstance:

  • disability and special education needs
  • localised information in each state and territory
  • rural, regional and remote support
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander support.

Making decisions about what to do when you leave school can be challenging. If you want to speak to someone about how you are feeling, there is a list of resources in the SLIK.

School leavers can also access a free, 45-minute personalised career guidance session with a qualified career practitioner.

School Leavers Information Service

School Leavers Information Service Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:19

Are you looking for tailored career support or guidance? Are you aged between 15 and 24? Did you know that there is a free, dedicated information service available to answer your questions and provide support? You can talk to an Information Officer or book a career guidance session with a qualified career practitioner.

Text, email or call

Our information officers will help you:

  • understand the School Leavers Information Kit (SLIK)
  • find and use the Your Career website
  • find the support services for you.

Our qualified career practitioners can take this one step further. You can book a free, 45-minute phone session with someone who understands what you’re going through. They can talk to you about:

  • career planning
  • training and further study
  • looking for work.

Your school is also there to help

If you’re still in school, your career advisor or guidance counsellor can help you work out the right options for you, including information on what’s available in your state or territory.

Help for parents and guardians

To help you start the conversation at home, we have developed the Parents and Guardian’s Guide for School Leavers.

This is available at yourcareer.gov.au/schoolleaver and has been designed to help you understand options available to support and assist your child in making their choice after they leave school.

Whether they choose to start working straight away or continue their education and training, or take an alternative pathway such as a gap year.

This guide sits alongside the SLIK and includes information on financial assistance and other support available to your child.

Yourcareer.gov.au

Yourcareer.gov.au Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:24

Helping you take the next step in Your Career

As the nation deals with COVID-19, there has never been a more important time for people to have reliable access to information about education, training and work pathways.

Yourcareer.gov.au is Australia’s authoritative source of careers information to help people take the next step in their careers – no matter what age or stage they are at.

For people looking for their first job, a change in career or a return to the workforce, Your Career makes it easy to find the information they need.

Your Career provides information about study or work options based on tailored careers information and highlights support programs available to help.

Delivered by the National Careers Institute, the Your Career website is powered by the National Skills Commission’s labour market intelligence.

Your Career includes:

  • career quizzes to explore a future career, or options now
  • study or training options to help gain new skills
  • tips for successful job search, including résumé writing
  • links to support services to help people find employment, manage wellbeing and understand their rights at work, and
  • an A to Z of occupations, including detailed career descriptions, pay and available jobs.
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Infographic. Your Options Now - Find the types of jobs currently available or a short course to build on your skills. Your Future Career - Find study, training or job options that support your current career needs or goals. Your Career has information to help you start, manage or transition your career. Get Career Ideas - Explore jobs that match your skills, interests and goals and be inspired by real career stories. Learn and Train - Study can help you get the job you want or extend your skills in a career

Jobs and Training

Jobs and Training Alexander Vilagosh Fri, 09/24/2021 - 14:08

Education and Employment

Education and Employment Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:27

There are many options when you are leaving school, or are entering or re-entering the workforce at an older age. For some people, the thought of further study is exciting, but for others it isn’t a viable or favoured choice.

If you are considering gaining additional qualifications, there are two main training pathways for you to consider.

  • The Vocational Education and Training (VET) system develops workplace-specific skills and knowledge by delivering nationally recognised training. VET includes publicly owned TAFE institutes, private providers (including enterprise and industry providers), community organisations and schools. It provides training for a vast array of occupations, including highly skilled Technician and Trades Worker roles.
  • Australia’s higher education system is made up of universities and other institutions that offer undergraduate degrees and higher qualifications. Higher education is the pathway to a range of jobs, including the most highly skilled Professional occupations.

Employment and training decisions should be based on a variety of factors including aptitude, interests, expectations of pay and working conditions, training and goals.

Educational attainment is rising

The number of people undertaking tertiary training is increasing and more of the workforce now holds post-school qualifications. In 2020, 64% of Australians aged 15 to 64 years held post-school qualifications (up from 57% in 2013), with growth recorded in both VET and higher education qualifications.

Post-school qualifications are beneficial in today’s jobs market

People with higher level qualifications generally have better employment outcomes than those who have not completed further education after leaving school.

Higher qualifications also generally lead to increased real wages. Some lower skilled occupations, though, have relatively high pay, sometimes to compensate for unsociable working hours or difficult working conditions.

What if I don’t complete further education?

Although most new jobs created in recent years (and those expected in the future) are in skilled occupations, there will continue to be large numbers of jobs in lower skilled occupations (that is, jobs which do not usually require post-school qualifications). Lower skilled occupations generally have higher turnover rates than those which require post-school qualifications and many job openings are available each year across all industries.

Significant proportions of Labourers (59%), Sales Workers (53%) and Machinery Operators and Drivers (51%) do not hold post-school qualifications. This includes occupations like General Sales Assistants, Waiters, Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers, and Truck Drivers.

There are opportunities in all industries for people who do not have post-school qualifications. For example, more than half of the jobs in Accommodation and Food Services and Retail Trade are held by workers who do not have such qualifications.

What is needed to gain employment without post-school qualifications?

There is often strong competition for jobs which do not require post-school qualifications. Previous experience is commonly required by employers and this can be a key barrier for new job seekers. There are, though, a number of strategies which can enhance a job seeker’s prospects. These are outlined on page 35.

Education Enrolments

Education Enrolments Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 16:25

Vocational Education and Training (VET)

The VET system provides a skilled workforce with nationally recognised qualifications and knowledge-based competencies. Students can enrol in qualifications (with around 1,800 on offer), accredited courses, industry-recognised skill sets and units of competency, allowing them to gain the specific skills they need, when they need them. Training takes place in classrooms, workplaces and online, and can be full-time or part-time.

Image
Graphic. 2.6 million vet program enrolments in 2020. Certificate I – 112,500. Certificate II – 476,500. Certificate III – 945,500. Certificate IV – 459,300. Diploma or higher – 419,100. Due to rounding, numbers may not sum to total.

In 2020, most VET program course enrolments were in the Management and Commerce and Society and Culture fields of education.

There were 3.9 million VET students in 2020, and around half of these students (1.9 million) were not enrolled in a full course. This study (officially referred to as nationally accredited stand-alone subjects) includes training that is critical to supporting employers and the Australian economy. Examples include enabling employers to meet workplace and public health and safety requirements, such as “construction white cards” for building sites, responsible service of alcohol and first-aid certifications.

Higher Education

Universities offer courses at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, including associate degrees, bachelor degrees, masters and PhD qualifications. The vast majority of students study at the bachelor degree level (79% in 2018). Higher education usually involves a commitment to at least three years of full-time equivalent study to attain a bachelor degree, but many courses involve longer periods of education.

There were 1.09 million domestic students enrolled in higher education in 2019 (up by 34% over the past decade).

What subject areas are available?

The higher education sector provides training in all fields of education, but the largest numbers of enrolments are in Society and culture (289,100 enrolments in 2019), which is a diverse field of education including studies in law, psychology, human welfare and society, language and linguistics, economics and sport and recreation.

Further information on higher education enrolments can be found at dese.gov.au/higher-education-statistics.

  2019 enrolments ('000) 10 year change (↑↓%)
Society and Culture 289.1 32.2%
Health 223.3 72.7%
Management and Commerce 183.2 10.3%
Education 115.2 20.2%
Natural and Physical Sciences 104.8 54.3%
Creative Arts 77.3 18.9%
Engineering and Related Technologies 66 21.5%
Information Technology 41.5 75.0%
Architecture and Building 28.6 34.6%
Agriculture Environmental and Related Studies 14.5 ↓  -4.1%
All fields of education 1086.1 ↑ 33.5%

Total includes some mixed field and non-award courses.

Apprenticeships and traineeships are a form of skills development that combine paid on-the-job work with training. They provide a nationally recognised VET qualification as well as relevant work experience.

Reflecting how highly workplace experience is valued by employers, apprentices and trainees generally have strong graduate employment outcomes.

There were 297,920 apprentices and trainees in training in December 2020, working across more than 500 different occupations, including many non-trade occupations.

Image
Occupations in which apprentices and trainees most commonly work. 64% of apprentices and trainees are technicians and trades workers, most commonly as electricians, carpenters and joiners, motor mechanics, plumbers and sheetmetal trades workers. 11% of apprentices and trainees are community and personal service workers, most commonly child carers, hospitality workers, nursing support and personal care workers, welfare support workers and dental assistants. 6% of apprentices and trainees are machinery operat

Sources: NCVER, Total VET Students and Courses; NCVER, Apprentices and Trainees; Department of Education, Skills and Employment, Higher Education Statistics; Universities Australia, 2020 Higher Education Facts and Figures.

Education Employment Outcomes

Education Employment Outcomes Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 09:44

VET graduate employment outcomes

Image
Graphic. 56.0% of VET graduates had an improved employment status after training. Trade apprenticeship or traineeship 85.0% improved employment status. Non-trade apprenticeship or traineeship 73.8% improved employment status. Other training 52.9% improved employment status.

A person has improved their employment status if they were not employed before but employed after, or employed at a higher skill level after training, or received at least one job-related benefit, such as a promotion (or increased status at work), gained extra skills for my job, or an increase in earnings.

 

What apprenticeships or traineeships are considered to be trades?

There is a wide range of occupations regarded as trades. Some examples are Bricklayers, Hairdressers, General Motor Mechanics, Electricians, Telecommunications Trade Workers, Aircraft Maintenance Engineers, Locksmiths, Cabinetmakers and Chefs.

Graduates in Education and Architecture and building commonly reported employability benefits from their study, with more than 65% of these graduates stating they improved their employment status after training.

Creative arts and Information technology graduates reported the least improvements in employment status after graduating (31% and 32% respectively).

Do VET graduates have high earnings?

Workers who hold a VET qualification at the certificate III or higher level generally earn more than those who have not studied after leaving school (see page 44). In 2020, the median annual income for VET Graduates, at the certificate II level or higher, working full-time after completing their training was $60,000. The highest median salaries were for those who studied

  • Education ($78,300)
  • Engineering and related technologies ($62,600)
  • Management and commerce ($61,500)

VET employment outcomes after graduation, 2020*

  Improved employment status after training (%) Median annual income 
Diploma or higher 63.5 $67,100
Certificate IV 64.5 $73,400
Certificate III 58.5 $52,200
Certificate II 42.8 $44,400

*Income figures are for those employed full-time, and are only available for graduates at certificate II and higher level.

Higher education graduate employment outcomes

COVID-19 has had a major impact on the Australian labour market, including graduate employment outcomes. As could be expected, graduate employment rates have declined between 2019 and 2020. The full-time undergraduate employment rate fell from 72.2% to 68.7%, the second lowest result since the 68.1% reported in 2014.

Vocationally oriented study areas (such as Pharmacy, Rehabilitation, Medicine, Engineering and Dentistry) generally have stronger employment outcomes immediately after graduation. Graduates with more generalist degrees (such as Creative arts and Communications) have weaker employment outcomes immediately after graduation, but they do improve significantly over time.

Higher education graduate salaries

In 2020, the median annual full-time starting salary for an undergraduate was $64,700.

Postgraduate coursework graduates had a median starting salary of $87,400 and for postgraduate research graduates it was $93,000.

  • Dentistry (median of $84,400)
  • Medicine ($75,000)
  • Social Work ($70,000)
  • Teacher education ($70,000)

Sources: NCVER, VET Student Outcomes; ABS, Characteristics of Employment; QILT, Graduate Outcomes Survey.

Government Programs

Government Programs Alexander Vilagosh Fri, 09/24/2021 - 14:10

Employee and Employer Incentives

Employee and Employer Incentives Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:32

Government assistance is available to help job seekers find the right job, and to help employers find the right workers. The information below is summary in nature and does not fully explain the large number of policies, programs and incentives available. More information is can be found on the Department of Education, Skills and Employment website dese.gov.au or you can call the National Customer Service Line on 1800 805 260.

Some useful resources are provided below.

jobactive

jobactive is the Australian Government’s way to get more Australians into work. It connects job seekers with employers and is delivered by a network of jobactive providers in over 1700 locations across Australia. jobactive providers assist job seekers to get and keep a job, and offer employers an end-to-end tailored recruitment service to find and hire staff. The jobactive website can help job seekers to find and apply for jobs, keep track of job searches, create a personal profile and get job alerts. Employers who hire an eligible job seeker could be eligible to receive a wage subsidy.

A jobactive provider can help job seekers to

  • write a résumé
  • look for work
  • prepare for interviews
  • get the skills that local employers need
  • find and keep a job
  • connect job seekers to a range of government initiatives.

A jobactive provider can help employers to

  • screen and shortlist applicants
  • find candidates for their business
  • assist new employees after they start work
  • access wage subsidies if they hire an eligible employee.

The jobactive website can help job seekers and employers find out more about jobactive and to find local providers. Job seekers can also call the Job Seeker Hotline on 1800 805 260, and employers can call the Employer Hotline on 13 17 15.

The jobactive program will be replaced by the New Employment Services Model in 2022.

Youth Jobs PaTH

An Australian Government program that supports young people to gain the work experience and skills they need to get and keep a job. Through Youth Jobs PaTH, young jobs seekers can undertake practical face-to-face training, tailored to their needs, to improve job preparation skills.

Job seekers can undertake an internship placement with a business looking for new staff. This allows employers to trial a young person in their business for 4-12 weeks, for up to 25 hours a week, where there is a reasonable prospect of employment at the end of the trial. If the trial results in employment, the employer may be eligible to receive a wage subsidy. Youth Jobs PaTH has 3 steps: Prepare – Trial – Hire.

Transition to Work

Supports young people (aged 15-24) on their journey to employment. Transition to Work helps workers get job-ready with intensive pre-employment support and helps them set and achieve employment and education goals.

Transition to Work providers work with employers to find and hire a young person suited to their organisation. Support can include a trial placement before starting the job. If the placement is a good fit and the young person is hired, the employer may be eligible to receive a wage subsidy.

New Business Assistance with NEIS

New Business Assistance with NEIS is for individuals who are interested in starting a business or who need help to refocus an existing micro-business impacted by COVID-19. The program provides accredited business training, assistance to develop a business plan and mentoring and advice in the first year of a new business. Since the program was introduced in 1985, it has helped more than 185,000 people start their own business. New Business Assistance with NEIS is delivered by a national network of NEIS providers. You can find your nearest NEIS provider at the website above.

Disability Employment Services

For job seekers with a disability, injury or health condition who need help to find or keep a job, Disability Employment Services can help. The JobAccess website also has comprehensive information to help job seekers understand their rights and responsibilities, find financial support for workplace modifications and help to find and keep a job.

A Disability Employment Services provider can help employers to hire someone with a disability. They will also provide:

  • Support to access financial assistance in the form of a wage subsidy to help with the costs of work-related modifications and services.
  • Post-placement support while the new employee settles in.

Community Development Program

The Community Development Program can help job seekers in remote areas of Australia improve workplace skills and employability. The support is tailored to the workforce needs of the area and helps contribute to the local community.

For businesses based in remote areas, the Community Development Program can offer financial incentives to manage the costs of employing remote job seekers. The program is designed around the unique social and labour market conditions found in remote Australia.

The Government will introduce a new remote jobs program in 2023, replacing the Community Development Program. This new program will be developed in partnership with communities and will complement the broader New Employment Services Model being rolled out in the latter half of 2022.

Australian Apprenticeships

The Australian Apprenticeships website provides information on apprenticeships and traineeships, including factsheets and links. An Australian Apprenticeship offers job seekers the opportunity to explore a new job, gain new skills, work flexible hours and receive a qualification. Eligible employers can receive financial incentives to help take on an apprentice, particularly if the apprenticeship is in a trade experiencing a skill shortage.

Additional Information

Additional Information Alexander Vilagosh Fri, 09/24/2021 - 14:11

Occupation matrix

Occupation matrix Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 13:50

How do I use the Matrix?

Employment and training decisions should be made after consideration of all relevant issues, including aptitude, interests, expectations about pay and working conditions, training requirements and goals.

The Occupation Matrix includes summary statistical information for around 350 occupations, which can provide useful background, but it needs to be read in conjunction with other occupational resources.

Titles in the Matrix have been grouped into broad categories based on field of work to assist users to better explore the labour market. There are 21 groupings.

  • Accounting, Banking and Financial Services
  • Administration and Human Resources
  • Advertising, Public Relations, Media and Arts
  • Agriculture, Animal and Horticulture
  • Automotive, Transport and Logistics
  • Construction, Architecture and Design
  • Education and Training
  • Electrical and Electronics
  • Engineers and Engineering Trades
  • Executive and General Management
  • Government, Defence and Protective Services
  • Health and Community Services
  • Hospitality, Food Services and Tourism
  • Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
  • Legal and Insurance
  • Manufacturing
  • Mining and Energy
  • Personal Services
  • Sales, Retail, Wholesale and Real Estate
  • Science
  • Sports and Recreation

Some titles appear in more than one category. The relevant occupation major group is listed in brackets after each occupation title.

Key Occupation
M Managers
P Professionals
TT Technicians and Trades Workers
CP Community and Personal Service Workers
CA Clerical and Administrative Workers
SW Sales Workers
MO Machinery Operators and Drivers
L Labourers

Employment and employment change

The employment information gives the total number of people employed in the occupation at May 2021. It includes both full-time and part-time workers.

Employment change refers to levels of employment increasing or decreasing, as well as the percentage change, over the five years to May 2021.

Data Source: ABS, Labour Force, seasonally adjusted

Working part-time

This column shows the proportion of workers in the occupation who work part-time. The information uses the ABS definition of part-time, which is working less than 35 hours per week.

Data Source: ABS, Labour Force, annual averages of original data

Female

This shows the proportion of those employed in the occupation who are female.

Data Source: ABS, Labour Force, annual averages of original data

Aged 15 to 24 years

This shows the proportion of those employed in the occupation who are aged 15 to 24 years

Data Source: ABS, Labour Force, annual averages of original data

Unemployment rate

The unemployment rate is the number of unemployed persons as a percentage of the labour force (employed plus unemployed). The unemployment rate is presented in three categories: below average, average and above average. These categories are based on the occupation’s average unemployment rate over 2021 relative to the average across all occupations.

Occupational unemployment rates do not reflect underutilised skills (such as an Accountant working as an Accounting Clerk). The occupational unemployment rate may be lower than the published national unemployment rate as it does not include first-time job seekers and those who have not worked full-time or part-time in the past two years.

An occupation may have a high unemployment rate but also be experiencing shortages for particular skills.

Data Source: ABS, Labour Force, annual averages of original data

Median earnings

Median weekly earnings are before tax and are for full-time workers. The median earnings ranges are for all ages and levels of experience. They are indicative only and cannot be used to determine what a worker will actually earn. Data are not available for all occupations.

Key Occupation
$ < $1055
$$ $1056 to $1,312
$$$ $1,313 to $1,643
$$$$ $1,644 to $2,133
$$$$$ > $2,133

Data Source: ABS, Survey of Employee Earnings and Hours, May 2018

No post-school qualification

The figures are a percentage of those employed in the occupation who have not completed education other than preprimary, primary or secondary education.

Data Source: ABS, Survey of Education and Work

Projected employment change

This presents the percentage change in employment projected over the five years to November 2025.

A large projected percentage growth in a small occupation can yield fewer new jobs than low projected growth in large occupations.

  • For example, 20% projected growth in an occupation that employs 300 people will create 60 new jobs. However, 5% projected growth in an occupation that employs 10,000 people will provide 500 new jobs.

These estimates do not provide any guidance about the number of job seekers in each occupation. Although there may be a large number of new jobs, there may be strong applicant competition for available positions.

Data Source: National Skills Commission, Employment Projections

The occupation matrix

Accounting, Banking and Financial Services

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Accountants (P) 198.1 22.4 12.7 19 52 4 Above Average $$$$ - 8.6
Accounting Clerks (CA) 144.1 21.3 17.4 37 79 8 Average $$ 32 2.1
Auditors and Company Secretaries (P) 32.8 11.5 53.9 12 47 6 Below Average $$$$ - 14.7
Bank Workers (CA) 44.8 -10.6 -19.1 25 70 11 Below Average $$ 42 -5.9
Bookkeepers (CA) 97.1 2.8 2.9 67 90 3 Below Average $$$ 32 0.9
Credit and Loans Officers (CA) 31.0 -1.6 -5.0 12 52 6 Below Average $$ 30 0.8
Debt Collectors (CA) 5.4 -6.8 -55.7 28 54 9 Below Average $$ 50 -4.5
Economists (P) 6.3 0.6 10.5 26 28 17 Below Average - - -5.8
Finance Managers (M) 68.7 16.3 31.1 12 46 0 Below Average $$$$$ 13 5.5
Financial Brokers (P) 32.8 0.4 1.3 15 36 2 Below Average $$$$$ 18 10.6
Financial Dealers (P) 17.8 1.4 8.3 18 25 3 Below Average $$$$$ - -3.8
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers (P) 52.1 3.1 6.4 18 28 4 Below Average $$$$$ - 10.8
Insurance, Money Market and Statistical Clerks (CA) 30.7 0.0 0.1 22 70 11 Below Average $ 31 2.1
Payroll Clerks (CA) 41.7 3.9 10.4 29 87 6 Below Average $$ 38 -0.1

Administration and Human Resources 

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Archivists, Curators and Records Managers (P) 8.7 4.3 96.1 11 70 4 Below Average $$$$ 40 1.9
Call or Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers (M) 46.1 5.7 14.0 13 48 3 Below Average $$$$ 36 -17.6
Call or Contact Centre Workers (CA) 33.6 7.5 28.9 24 66 16 Average $$ 40 7.3
Contract, Program and Project Administrators (CA) 123.0 -0.2 -0.2 15 53 4 Average $$$ 18 8.8
Corporate Services Managers (M) 48.2 39.7 466.6 13 46 1 Below Average $$$$$ 13 7.8
Filing and Registry Clerks (CA) 16.8 -3.9 -19.0 38 75 14 Below Average $$ 41 -0.6
General Clerks (CA) 311.2 36.8 13.4 41 84 11 Above Average $ 36 10.5
Human Resource Managers (M) 72.0 22.9 46.6 12 56 2 Below Average $$$$$ 16 15.6
Human Resource Professionals (P) 80.4 18.4 29.6 16 71 5 Average $$$$ 21 7.2
Information Officers (CA) 88.3 14.4 19.5 28 74 17 Average $ 37 12.1
Keyboard Operators (CA) 53.7 -0.8 -1.5 38 83 16 Average $$ 48 2.3
Mail Sorters (CA) 15.3 2.7 21.3 36 44 15 Below Average - 90 -8.4
Management and Organisation Analysts (P) 101.5 41.2 68.4 18 44 4 Average $$$$ - 14.9
Office Managers (CA) 115.9 -34.5 -22.9 34 77 4 Below Average $$$ 39 7.3
Personal Assistants (CA) 50.6 2.4 5.0 28 96 8 Average $$ 29 -11.3
Receptionists (CA) 164.5 -16.8 -9.3 57 92 22 Above Average $$ 44 -0.4
Secretaries (CA) 29.4 -20.5 -41.0 47 95 9 Below Average $$ 29 -25.7
Survey Interviewers (CA) 3.2 1.6 104.6 77 34 7 Below Average $$$ 65 1.1
Switchboard Operators (CA) 1.7 -3.4 -66.3 68 95 15 Below Average $$ 225 -20.2

Advertising, Public Relations, Media and Arts

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021 (Pending)
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Actors, Dancers and Other Entertainers (P) 8.4 0.9 12.6 52 58 26 Below Average $$$ - 4.4
Advertising and Marketing Professionals (P) 88.9 19.9 28.8 20 59 11 Average $$$$ 11 21.1
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers (M) 156.5 30.7 24.4 12 44 3 Average $$$$$ 18 13.5
Artistic Directors, Media Producers & Presenters (P) 12.9 -2.2 -14.5 25 49 6 Below Average $$$$ 10 -9.2
Authors, and Book and Script Editors (P) 9.4 4.4 87.0 51 76 1 Below Average $$$ 11 5.6
Fashion, Industrial and Jewellery Designers (P) 12.4 0.1 0.5 23 55 10 Below Average - 36 19.4
Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors (P) 18.3 2.9 18.7 23 33 6 Below Average $$$ 17 8.9
Gallery, Library and Museum Technicians (TT) 9.1 1.4 18.0 53 89 1 Below Average $$$ 25 -3.6
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators (P) 54.1 0.9 1.6 29 53 12 Average $$$ 13 12.9
Jewellers (TT) 3.2 1.2 57.9 25 38 2 Below Average - 11 0.4
Journalists and Other Writers (P) 27.9 3.1 12.6 33 66 11 Below Average $$$ - 6.1
Models and Sales Demonstrators (SW) 5.9 -2.2 -27.3 86 85 2 Below Average $$$$ 83 1.5
Music Professionals (P) 13.0 2.8 28.0 70 31 22 Below Average $$$$ 47 -1.6
Performing Arts Technicians (TT) 17.0 5.3 45.0 44 34 20 Below Average $$$ 24 0.2
Photographers (P) 16.1 5.0 44.8 40 60 6 Below Average - 43 0.5
Public Relations Professionals (P) 25.1 0.6 2.4 32 66 10 Below Average $$$$ - 9.1
Signwriters (TT) 6.2 -1.2 -15.9 16 6 12 Below Average $$$ 52 0.0
Visual Arts and Crafts Professionals (P) 12.5 3.3 36.3 52 64 8 Below Average - 48

11.0

Agriculture, Animal and Horticulture

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021 (Pending)
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Agricultural and Forestry Scientists (P) 6.5 -1.7 -20.8 13 18 6 Below Average $$$$$ - 6.1
Agricultural Technicians (TT) 1.5 -2.7 -64.7 18 35 19 Below Average $$$ - -0.9
Agricultural, Forestry and Horticultural Plant Operators (MO) 12.5 -1.5 -11.0 15 5 19 Below Average $$$ 72 1.8
Animal Attendants and Trainers (TT) 21.5 8.7 68.1 48 80 17 Below Average $ 47 5.8
Aquaculture Farmers (M) 1.4 -0.3 -18.8 15 10 2 Below Average - 86 -5.0
Aquaculture Workers (L) 1.0 -1.0 -51.7 48 13 3 Below Average $ 73 3.8
Crop Farm Workers (L) 24.9 1.7 7.5 35 35 20 Average - 69 -1.4
Crop Farmers (M) 40.8 1.3 3.4 18 21 4 Below Average $$$$ 36 0.8
Deck and Fishing Hands (L) 5.4 -4.4 -44.8 27 24 26 Below Average $$ 47 -2.4
Forestry and Logging Workers (L) 1.1 -0.9 -44.1 9 6 3 Below Average $$ 79 -6.0
Gardeners (TT) 83.0 12.4 17.6 31 12 16 Average $$ 33 8.6
Garden and Nursery Labourers (L) 35.5 -3.9 -9.9 34 18 22 Average $ 37 4.3
Livestock Farm Workers (L) 27.2 -9.9 -26.7 43 40 31 Below Average - 61 5.1
Livestock Farmers (M) 90.6 14.1 18.4 31 35 2 Below Average - 44 2.0
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farm Workers (L) 1.3 -1.3 -50.2 21 28 40 Below Average $$ 58 5.9
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmers (M) 28.0 4.6 19.7 22 22 1 Below Average - 41 4.5
Nurserypersons (TT) 2.8 0.0 0.7 21 36 12 Below Average $$ 41 1.8
Primary Products Inspectors (TT) 7.2 4.6 179.4 17 43 0 Below Average $$$$ 32 0.0
Shearers (TT) 0.6 -1.5 -71.4 15 0 32 Below Average - 106 -2.9
Veterinarians (P) 14.1 5.2 59.1 30 71 2 Below Average $$$ - 16.6
Veterinary Nurses (TT) 12.4 3.9 46.3 44 95 36 Below Average $$ 17 8.5

Automotive, Transport and Logistics

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Air Transport Professionals (P) 9.1 -5.6 -38.1 24 9 7 Below Average $$$$$ 13 1.5
Automobile Drivers (MO) 48.6 0.6 1.3 34 3 4 Average $$$ 27 9.6
Automotive Electricians (TT) 9.0 0.9 11.1 6 0 11 Below Average - - 6.3
Bus and Coach Drivers (MO) 47.9 10.8 29.2 38 15 0 Below Average $$$$$ 48 9.1
Car Detailers (L) 19.0 0.7 4.0 42 15 23 Below Average $ 64 1.0
Couriers and Postal Deliverers (CA) 47.3 -2.2 -4.5 23 17 8 Below Average $$ 59 -2.3
Delivery Drivers (MO) 74.9 22.9 43.9 44 9 25 Average $$$ 53 10.1
Forklift Drivers (MO) 61.4 8.4 15.8 9 4 8 Above Average $$$ 56 -1.0
Freight and Furniture Handlers (L) 15.1 -0.6 -3.6 36 10 25 Below Average $ 49 7.1
Marine Transport Professionals (P) 6.1 -4.1 -40.1 11 1 0 Below Average $$$$ - 3.5
Motor Mechanics (TT) 106.6 14.6 15.9 10 2 18 Below Average $$$ 22 1.6
Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters (L) 12.1 2.9 32.0 8 1 19 Below Average $ 62 5.6
Panelbeaters (TT) 13.0 1.3 10.8 10 0 10 Below Average $$ 26 -5.9
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks (CA) 94.0 13.8 17.2 16 41 8 Above Average $$$ 44 3.9
Railway Track Workers (L) 7.9 5.1 184.3 12 15 25 Below Average $$$$ 59 4.2
Recycling and Rubbish Collectors (L) 4.1 2.0 98.8 18 12 7 Below Average $$ - 0.0
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers (M) 41.8 -1.3 -2.9 7 23 1 Below Average $$$$$ 34 10.2
Train and Tram Drivers (MO) 11.1 2.7 31.5 3 9 9 Below Average $ 38 6.8
Transport and Despatch Clerks (CA) 35.5 -0.8 -2.3 12 35 7 Below Average $$ 39 5.3
Transport Services Managers (M) 14.3 -11.6 -44.7 13 21 2 Below Average $$$$$ 28 -14.1
Truck Drivers (MO) 160.5 -34.7 -17.8 11 4 5 Above Average $ 57 6.5
Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers (TT) 5.0 -0.4 -7.8 12 2 2 Below Average $$ 67 0.0
Vehicle Painters (TT) 7.8 -0.2 -2.7 10 5 19 Below Average $$$ 26 -2.1

Construction, Architecture and Design

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Architects and Landscape Architects (P) 46.4 19.9 75.0 20 37 2 Below Average $$$$ - 17.5
Architectural, Building & Surveying Technicians (TT) 78.2 16.2 26.1 12 14 5 Average $$$$ 20 8.6
Bricklayers and Stonemasons (TT) 24.1 -0.3 -1.3 11 0 10 Below Average $$$$ 41 2.0
Building and Plumbing Labourers (L) 63.2 3.7 6.2 22 3 25 Above Average $$$$ 42 6.5
Cabinetmakers (TT) 25.7 -0.7 -2.8 9 3 24 Below Average $ 25 0.9
Carpenters and Joiners (TT) 143.1 9.6 7.2 9 1 28 Average $$$ 22 8.1
Civil Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians (TT) 11.8 -0.8 -6.6 9 15 6 Below Average $$$ 18 -2.4
Civil Engineering Professionals (P) 53.0 10.8 25.7 8 16 10 Below Average $$$$ - 15.2
Concreters (L) 31.5 -6.0 -16.1 10 2 18 Below Average $$ 63 1.8
Construction Managers (M) 116.7 22.6 24.1 9 9 4 Below Average $$$$$ 12 12.0
Crane, Hoist and Lift Operators (MO) 15.1 -1.4 -8.4 8 1 2 Below Average $$$$$ 29 5.4
Earthmoving Plant Operators (MO) 47.6 7.9 19.8 7 1 3 Below Average $$ 46 0.6
Fencers (L) 8.9 0.6 7.7 14 3 10 Below Average $$$ 38 3.2
Floor Finishers (TT) 8.6 0.1 1.5 24 2 7 Below Average - 68 1.4
Glaziers (TT) 6.7 -6.8 -50.1 7 3 6 Below Average $ 29 -1.2
Insulation and Home Improvement Installers (L) 22.6 1.2 5.5 17 4 9 Below Average $$ 57 4.4
Interior Designers (P) 22.4 12.8 133.1 34 78 4 Below Average $$ - 16.2
Land Economists and Valuers (P) 10.5 0.1 1.0 19 19 3 Below Average $$$$ - 1.8
Other Building and Engineering Technicians (TT) 35.1 10.4 41.9 4 15 3 Below Average $$$$$ 18 15.5
Painting Trades Workers (TT) 44.4 -5.7 -11.4 18 5 11 Below Average $$$ 29 2.6
Paving and Surfacing Labourers (L) 6.5 -1.6 -19.4 13 3 13 Below Average $$$$ 33 2.7
Plasterers (TT) 22.5 -14.4 -38.9 13 0 16 Below Average $$$ 35 -6.1
Plumbers (TT) 84.6 2.1 2.5 7 2 24 Below Average $$$$ 21 6.3
Roof Tilers (TT) 10.3 1.8 20.7 11 2 25 Below Average - 28 3.1
Safety Inspectors (TT) 6.8 3.0 77.5 21 12 4 Below Average $$$$ - 6.2
Structural Steel Construction Workers (L) 22.6 3.2 16.5 7 0 7 Below Average $$$$ 35 6.5
Urban and Regional Planners (P) 19.5 8.4 74.8 17 51 6 Below Average $$$$ - 13.8
Wall and Floor Tilers (TT) 20.7 -3.3 -13.8 19 5 15 Below Average $$$ 41 -4.6

Education and Training

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021   Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Driving Instructors (CP) 6.9 1.4 25.7 42 21 2 Below Average $$ 30 7.0
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers (P) 51.1 14.6 40.1 47 98 14 Below Average $$$ - 17.2
Education Advisers and Reviewers (P) 19.8 5.0 34.1 34 74 2 Below Average $$$$ - 2.0
Education Aides (CP) 118.8 32.3 37.4 75 90 12 Average $$ 23 14.6
Librarians (P) 15.4 4.8 46.0 39 91 3 Below Average $$$$ - 2.6
Library Assistants (CA) 6.5 -0.5 -7.6 44 68 14 Below Average $$$ 27 -0.1
Primary School Teachers (P) 178.9 40.2 29.0 34 86 7 Average $$$$ - 6.5
Private Tutors and Teachers (P) 51.9 6.7 14.7 81 72 38 Below Average $$ 33 10.3
School Principals (M) 23.9 -2.3 -8.8 9 71 1 Below Average - - 13.9
Secondary School Teachers (P) 121.0 -8.9 -6.9 21 64 4 Below Average $$$$ - 6.2
Special Education Teachers (P) 17.8 -7.2 -28.8 41 80 3 Below Average $$$$ 10 19.8
Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (P) 6.0 0.7 12.5 67 73 4 Below Average $$$ - -12.0
Training and Development Professionals (P) 29.4 10.5 55.1 18 62 4 Below Average $$$$ 20 -10.0
University Lecturers and Tutors (P) 60.4 12.2 25.4 29 50 3 Average $$$$$ - 9.0
Vocational Education Teachers (P) 38.0 8.0 26.8 35 46 2 Below Average $$$$ - 5.3

Electrical and Electronics

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021   Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics (TT) 28.5 0.7 2.4 4 3 23 Below Average $$$ 25 4.0
Electrical Distribution Trades Workers (TT) 5.6 -0.8 -12.9 3 6 1 Below Average $$$$$ - 0.0
Electrical Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians (TT) 8.4 -2.4 -21.9 4 4 3 Below Average $$$$ 20 2.3
Electrical Engineers (P) 29.1 9.0 44.8 8 8 5 Below Average $$$$$ - 11.4
Electricians (TT) 175.9 26.8 18.0 8 1 20 Average $$$$ 22 10.9
Electronic Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians (TT) 5.9 -0.2 -3.5 12 7 0 Below Average $$$ - -9.6
Electronics Engineers (P) 6.6 -0.8 -10.5 14 10 13 Below Average $$$$$ - 9.1
Electronics Trades Workers (TT) 24.1 -3.9 -14.0 12 5 10 Below Average $$$ 29 -0.1

Engineers and Engineering Trades

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021   Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Aircraft Maintenance Engineers (TT) 12.2 1.6 15.4 2 2 15 Below Average $$$$ - 7.8
Chemical and Materials Engineers (P) 5.4 1.2 28.4 14 16 18 Below Average $$$$$ - 5.7
Civil Engineering Professionals (P) 53.0 10.8 25.7 8 16 10 Below Average $$$$ - 15.2
Electrical Engineers (P) 29.1 9.0 44.8 8 8 5 Below Average $$$$$ - 11.4
Electronics Engineers (P) 6.6 -0.8 -10.5 14 10 13 Below Average $$$$$ - 9.1
Engineering Managers (M) 27.7 9.6 53.2 2 17 1 Below Average $$$$$ - 9.0
Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers (P) 41.4 14.9 56.3 7 9 10 Below Average $$$$$ - 15.9
Mechanical Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians (TT) 4.9 -0.2 -3.9 13 14 3 Below Average $$$$ 17 4.3
Metal Casting, Forging and Finishing Trades Workers (TT) 3.3 1.7 102.8 28 0 1 Below Average $$$$ 48 2.7
Metal Fitters and Machinists (TT) 106.0 -3.2 -2.9 4 1 12 Average $$$$ 18 -0.9
Mining Engineers (P) 15.4 6.2 67.4 8 23 3 Below Average $$$$$ - 13.9
Precision Metal Trades Workers (TT) 8.7 0.9 11.5 13 5 17 Below Average $$ 50 1.4
Sheetmetal Trades Workers (TT) 6.0 1.5 32.4 7 0 25 Below Average $$$ 31 0.9
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers (TT) 77.5 9.3 13.7 9 2 16 Average $$$ 18 -0.5
Telecommunications Engineering Professionals (P) 14.4 2.8 24.6 7 27 4 Below Average $$$$$ - 16.3
Toolmakers and Engineering Patternmakers (TT) 4.6 -0.1 -2.7 16 0 2 Below Average - - -2.2

Executive and General Management

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021   Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Chief Executives and Managing Directors (M) 57.2 -3.6 -6.0 12 30 0 Below Average - 11 -7.3
General Managers (M) 76.9 17.6 29.8 9 35 0 Below Average - 25 -4.8
Policy and Planning Managers (M) 33.0 13.0 65.3 15 55 0 Below Average $$$$$ - 4.8
Research and Development Managers (M) 15.6 3.7 31.2 14 60 1 Below Average $$$$$ - 10.7

Government, Defence and Protective Services

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021   Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Commissioned Officers (Management) (M) 2.3 -0.6 -19.6 0 15 0 Below Average $$$$$ - 3.0
Fire and Emergency Workers (CP) 20.3 -0.5 -2.5 6 17 7 Below Average $$$$ 17 4.0
Inspectors and Regulatory Officers (CA) 33.6 3.1 10.0 15 46 4 Below Average $$$ 31 7.8
Intelligence and Policy Analysts (P) 34.4 12.1 54.5 14 58 4 Below Average $$$$ 12 4.9
Police (CP) 70.9 13.0 22.4 5 26 6 Below Average $$$ 15 7.6
Prison Officers (CP) 20.4 3.7 22.3 3 33 1 Below Average $$$ 19 6.8
Security Officers and Guards (CP) 52.5 5.3 11.3 29 18 10 Below Average $ 23 5.5

Health and Community Services

Occupation Employ’t May 2021 5 year change to May 2021   Working Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Unemploy’t Rate
2021
Median Earnings No Post-school Qual Projected Employ't Change
  ‘000 ‘000 % % % %     % %
Aged and Disabled Carers (CP) 240.9 77.3 47.3 62 76 12 Above Average $$ 18 24.7
Ambulance Officers and Paramedics (CP) 16.8 -5.2 -23.7 17 39 5 Below Average $$$$$ 12 10.6
Anaesthetists (P) 5.6 2.0 56.9 11 32 0 Below Average - - 9.5
Child Care Centre Managers (M) 11.7 -0.4 -3.5 23 92 8 Below Average $$ - 13.3
Child Carers (CP) 132.5 -12.5 -8.6 55 96 27 Above Average $ 20 10.2
Chiropractors and Osteopaths (P) 11.9 3.4 40.5 52 44 2 Below Average - - 5.8
Counsellors (P) 25.7 5.0 24.0 42 82 3 Below Average $$$ - 14.5
Dental Assistants (CP) 21.9 -1.6 -6.8 49 93 24 Below Average $$ 27 0.7
Dental Hygienists, Technicians and Therapists (CP) 8.1 -2.4 -23.1 41 75 6 Below Average - - 6.6
Dental Practitioners (P) 20.3 8.4 70.3 40 52 5 Below Average $$$$ - 16.7
Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses (CP) 26.2 2.5 10.5 59 91 9 Below Average $$$ - 9.8
Generalist Medical Practitioners (P) 70.2 10.5 17.5 24 47 2 Below Average $$$$$ - 15.3
Health and Welfare Services Managers (M) 32.9 10.5 47.3 15 79 1 Below Average $$$$$ - 17.8
Massage Therapists (CP) 15.5 -0.9 -5.3 72 86 7 Below Average $ - 15.6
Medical Imaging Professionals (P) 17.2 3.5 25.8 35 75 5 Below Average $$$$$ - 15.1
Medical Technicians (TT) 33.8 2.3 7.3 47 81 12