Jobs by Location

Jobs by Location Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 13:38
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Jobs by location infographic page. New South Wales is Australia’s largest employing state. One in four Victorians work in either Health Care or Social Assistance or Retail Trade. 32% of Queensland workers hold a certificate 3 or higher vocational qualification. More than 75% of employment in South Australia is concentrated in Adelaide. Nearly 45% of Mining jobs across Australia are in this state. More than half of Tasmanian jobs are located in regional Tasmania. Northern Territory.

New South Wales

New South Wales Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 13:50
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graphic shows 33% of jobs are regional. 14% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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39% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 28% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 28% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in New South Wales

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 566.8 14 70.6 14.2
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 463.4 11 107.2 30.1
Education and Training 394.7 9 75.8 23.8
Retail Trade 394.4 9 13.0 3.4
Construction 350.4 8 7.6 2.2
Accommodation and Food Services 257.7 6 -11.2 -4.2
Public Administration and Safety 257.6 6 48.9 23.4
Manufacturing 255.2 6 -4.8 -1.8
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 217.2 5 13.7 6.7
Financial and Insurance Services 206.0 5 11.0 5.7
Other Services 172.5 4 24.2 16.3
Administrative and Support Services 129.6 3 -9.0 -6.5
Wholesale Trade 121.1 3 -11.3 -8.6
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 81.2 2 -2.8 -3.4
Arts and Recreation Services 80.9 2 9.4 13.2
Information Media and Telecommunications 72.7 2 1.4 1.9
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 71.9 2 -4.6 -6.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 39.6 1 1.6 4.2
Mining 36.8 1 4.1 12.6

New South Wales is the largest employing state in Australia. Most jobs are in Sydney, which accounts for almost 70% of the state’s employment.

Around 70% of the state’s workforce has post-school qualifications and they are more likely to hold a bachelor degree or higher than workers nationally. Greater Sydney has the most highly educated workforce in the state, with 75% holding post-school qualifications (including 46% with a bachelor degree or higher).

There are multiple regions, however, where it is far more common for workers to have VET qualifications rather than those gained through a university (such as the Mid North Coast where 47% of the workforce has a certificate III or higher VET qualification). The age profile of this state is largely in line with the national average, although some regions have relatively large shares of workers aged 15 to 24 years. These include Coffs Harbour – Grafton, Illawarra and the Riverina.

Self-employment may also offer an opportunity for work or a different career path. While it is less common in New South Wales than in some other areas, around 17% of workers are their own boss.

The impact of COVID-19 on the New South Wales labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in New South Wales fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 266,400 or 6.5%). Over the same period, the participation rate also declined, from 65.4% in March 2020, to 62.1% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded in the state since October 2004, while the state’s unemployment rate rose from 5.0% in March 2020, to a peak of 7.1% in July 2020, the highest rate recorded since November 1998.

Labour market conditions strengthened in New South Wales between May 2020 and July 2021, with employment increasing by 257,800 (or 6.7%), while the unemployment rate fell to 4.5% in July 2021. The state’s participation rate increased by 2.8 percentage points over the period, to 64.9% in July 2021. That said, the current COVID-19 outbreak (and associated lockdown) is dampening labour market activity significantly in New South Wales, with 63,600 people leaving the labour force in July. Moreover, employment in the state decreased by 36,400 in July 2021, while total hours worked fell sharply, by 7.0%.

The Internet Vacancy Index fell by 10.3% in July 2021, the strongest decline of any jurisdiction, although it is still 1.2 times higher than its pre-pandemic level. That said, a considerable degree of uncertainty remains around the outlook, particularly with respect to COVID-19 and associated restrictions.

Employment by region, New South Wales

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Sydney 2775.5 233.6 9.2 29 47 14 18 46 24 25
Capital Region 108.8 0.7 0.6 32 48 15 24 25 34 37
Central West 112.2 8.2 7.9 28 46 15 28 20 35 30
Coffs Harbour - Grafton 56 -6.9 -10.9 35 48 18 23 30 31 32
Far West and Orana 53.4 1.1 2 29 47 16 25 23 34 33
Hunter Valley (exc Newcastle) 128.7 4.5 3.6 34 48 14 22 13 48 37
Illawarra 160 18.3 12.9 38 48 17 21 29 34 28
Mid North Coast 81.1 -4 -4.7 40 51 13 32 18 47 27
Murray 57.8 12.3 26.9 35 50 15 23 27 35 35
New England and North West 88.6 7.8 9.6 28 48 14 32 22 39 38
Newcastle and Lake Macquarie 180.2 2.8 1.6 33 50 15 18 29 34 35
Richmond - Tweed 118.4 12.9 12.2 41 50 16 23 19 34 35
Riverina 82 2 2.5 32 48 17 27 18 37 38
Southern Highlands and Shoalhaven 65.3 1.4 2.2 37 49 14 26 21 39 34
New South Wales 4164 334.9 8.7 30 47 14 20 39 28 28
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Victoria

Victoria Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:01
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The Victoria graphic shows 24% of jobs are regional. 13% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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41% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 28% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 26% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Victoria

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 478.3 14 71.7 17.6
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 354.6 10 80.2 29.2
Retail Trade 348.6 10 11.3 3.4
Construction 318.1 9 43.3 15.8
Education and Training 296.3 9 59.1 24.9
Manufacturing 274.5 8 -5.7 -2.0
Accommodation and Food Services 222.2 6 7.3 3.4
Public Administration and Safety 202.1 6 55.5 37.8
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 164.4 5 4.7 2.9
Financial and Insurance Services 143.3 4 26.5 22.7
Other Services 131.2 4 22.8 21.0
Administrative and Support Services 107.9 3 -2.1 -1.9
Wholesale Trade 107.7 3 3.4 3.3
Arts and Recreation Services 83.9 2 15.4 22.4
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 76.8 2 -19.6 -20.3
Information Media and Telecommunications 61.2 2 3.1 5.4
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 51.1 1 7.0 16.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 35.9 1 4.4 13.9
Mining 10.4 0 0.6 5.6

Victoria is the second largest employing state, with the majority of jobs located in Melbourne. While Victorians are employed across all industries, around one in four work in either Health Care and Social Assistance or Retail Trade.

Around 74% of Victorian workers have post-school qualifications, with a relatively large share holding a bachelor degree or higher. Workers in Melbourne are more likely to hold a bachelor degree or higher qualification than those in regional Victoria, where a certificate III or higher VET qualification is relatively more common.

Part-time work accounts for around a third of the state’s total employment. Workers in both Latrobe - Gippsland and Bendigo are the most likely to be employed in this manner (39% and 38%). A full breakdown of part-time work across the state is available in the table below.

The size and diversity of the Victorian labour market means employment opportunities continue to exist across all industries. Employers need workers who are resilient, proactive and capable and, if you are able to demonstrate these attributes, you will stand out from the crowd. Digital skills are also important, with continued enhancements in technology affecting jobs and society more broadly.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Victoria labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19, and against the backdrop of an extended lockdown and trading restrictions in the state over much of the second half of 2020, employment in Victoria fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in the labour market in September 2020 (down by 238,600 or 6.9%).

Moreover, between March and September 2020, 196,700 people left the labour force in the state, pushing the participation rate down, from 66.3% in March 2020, to 62.8% in September 2020, the lowest rate recorded in Victoria since November 2003. In addition, the unemployment rate rose sharply, from 5.2% in March 2020, to a peak of 7.3% in October 2020.

Since the trough in September 2020, employment in Victoria has rebounded strongly, increasing by 259,300 (or 8.1%) and is now 20,700 (or 0.6%) above its pre-pandemic level as at July 2021. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 66.5% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate stood at 4.5%, below the 5.2% recorded in March 2020.

While there has been strong growth in recruitment activity in Victoria, with job advertisements 1.4 times higher than their pre-pandemic level, the recent outbreak of COVID-19 cases in the state, and subsequent lockdown, is likely to dampen labour market activity in the coming months. That said, a considerable degree of uncertainty remains around the outlook, particularly with respect to COVID-19 and associated restrictions.

Employment by region, Victoria

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Melbourne 2612.1 261.8 11.1 31 47 13 17 46 25 25
Ballarat 80.1 7.3 10 37 45 15 21 22 34 39
Bendigo 78.7 10.3 15 38 49 14 27 27 38 30
Geelong 162.3 32.6 25.1 37 48 14 21 33 35 27
Hume 93.6 4.4 5 37 48 9 30 29 40 25
Latrobe - Gippsland 125.1 5.9 4.9 39 47 14 31 17 45 33
North West 67.2 2.6 4.1 34 43 11 31 21 44 25
Shepparton 58.2 -6.8 -10.4 37 49 20 27 14 37 39
Warrnambool and South West 66.2 1.3 2 37 49 17 32 18 42 32
Victoria 3453.7 383.6 12.5 32 47 13 19 41 28 26
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Queensland

Queensland Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:07
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The Queensland graphic shows 51% of jobs are regional. 16% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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31% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 31% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Queensland

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 385.5 15 70.0 22.2
Retail Trade 296.2 11 41.2 16.2
Construction 234.9 9 14.4 6.5
Education and Training 210.8 8 19.0 9.9
Accommodation and Food Services 210.5 8 43.4 26.0
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 197.3 7 39.7 25.2
Manufacturing 193.1 7 26.8 16.1
Public Administration and Safety 148.9 6 -8.5 -5.4
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 140.2 5 2.5 1.8
Other Services 104.5 4 -4.6 -4.3
Administrative and Support Services 88.3 3 4.6 5.5
Mining 83.0 3 32.7 65.0
Financial and Insurance Services 79.5 3 19.5 32.4
Wholesale Trade 77.3 3 10.4 15.6
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 60.8 2 -1.1 -1.7
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 58.1 2 7.5 14.8
Arts and Recreation Services 40.4 2 0.0 0.1
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 31.5 1 -0.8 -2.4
Information Media and Telecommunications 26.0 1 -6.1 -19.0

Queensland is the third largest employing state in Australia, with around half the jobs located in Brisbane and a further 13% in the Gold Coast area.

Given the size and diversity of the Queensland economy, employment opportunities exist across all industries. Health Care and Social Assistance is the largest employing industry in Queensland, with 15% of the state’s employment. There are many roles within this industry that do not require medical qualifications or extensive prior experience. Some of these include Receptionists, General Clerks, Kitchenhands and Commercial Cleaners.

Construction is another large employer, representing around 9% of total employment.

Workers in Queensland are less likely than the national average to hold a bachelor degree or higher, but are more likely to have a certificate III or higher qualification. There is a higher proportion of females employed in this state than the national average and around one in three Queensland workers are employed part-time.

It is worth noting that Queenslanders are more likely to be self-employed than workers in the rest of Australia, with around one in six employed Queenslanders working as their own boss.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Queensland labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19, employment in Queensland fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 198,400 or 7.7%). Over the same period, 154,600 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 65.5% in March 2020, to 61.7% in May 2020. In addition, the unemployment rate rose, from 5.8% in March 2020, to 7.8% in May 2020, before peaking at 8.7% in July 2020, the highest rate since May 2001.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases, and subsequent easing in restrictions in the state, employment increased by 293,400 between May 2020 and July 2021, and is 95,000 (or 3.7%) above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in Queensland increased to 66.6% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is now below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 5.2% in July 2021.

While the Internet Vacancy Index fell by 1.8% over the month to July 2021 (reflecting the lockdown in parts of Queensland at that time) job advertisements remain 1.5 times higher than their pre-pandemic level. Despite the recent absence of community transmission of COVID-19, some uncertainty surrounds the outlook for the Queensland labour market, given rising cases in New South Wales and Victoria (and ongoing border closures), which may also dampen economic and labour market activity in the state.

Employment by region, Queensland

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Brisbane 1287 102.1 8.6 31 48 16 17 38 28 28
Cairns 127.9 20.6 19.2 33 48 13 24 16 45 39
Darling Downs - Maranoa 64.1 0.2 0.3 32 48 14 29 11 35 41
Fitzroy 117.3 3.4 3 33 46 14 25 23 38 31
Gold Coast 342 29.4 9.4 35 50 17 19 29 33 32
Mackay - Isaac - Whitsunday 96 7.8 8.9 27 45 14 18 14 47 38
Queensland - Outback 38 3.1 8.9 19 44 11 24 7 54 44
Sunshine Coast 182 8.1 4.7 40 50 17 25 36 30 26
Toowoomba 75.2 4.2 6 29 46 12 21 29 40 29
Townsville 112.9 13.2 13.3 33 49 21 21 20 28 47
Wide Bay 113.3 1.5 1.4 35 50 14 27 21 37 36
Queensland 2644.6 290 12.3 32 48 16 20 31 32 31
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

South Australia

South Australia Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 09:46
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The South Australia graphic shows 23% of jobs are regional. 15% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 16% of workers are self-employed.
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26% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 35% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in South Australia

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 130.4 15 10.4 8.7
Retail Trade 86.3 10 -7.1 -7.6
Education and Training 75.7 9 16.1 27.1
Construction 71.7 8 12.3 20.6
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 70.5 8 15.2 27.5
Public Administration and Safety 68.1 8 9.8 16.8
Manufacturing 66.2 8 -7.5 -10.2
Accommodation and Food Services 58.2 7 0.7 1.3
Other Services 42.9 5 5.6 14.9
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 34.7 4 -1.7 -4.7
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 34.6 4 2.4 7.3
Administrative and Support Services 31.0 4 3.0 10.7
Financial and Insurance Services 21.3 2 0.1 0.3
Wholesale Trade 20.6 2 -3.2 -13.6
Mining 18.6 2 9.8 111.7
Arts and Recreation Services 12.1 1 2.4 25.4
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 10.7 1 -3.3 -23.6
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 9.2 1 1.2 14.8
Information Media and Telecommunications 8.3 1 -2.0 -19.7

South Australia has a relatively small workforce, with around 7% of national employment. Employment is concentrated in Adelaide, which accounts for 77% of state employment.

While there are employment opportunities available across all industries, more than one in three workers are employed in Health Care and Social Assistance, Retail Trade or Education and Training. Information Media and Telecommunications is South Australia’s smallest industry, accounting for 1% of employment.

Part-time employment is relatively common in this state, accounting for around 35% of employment (compared with the national average of 32%). The Barossa - Yorke - Mid North area (encompassing Clare, Peterborough, Port Pirie, Tanunda and Wallaroo) has the largest proportion of part-time employment in the state.

South Australian workers are less likely to hold post-school qualifications than workers nationally. Reversing the national trend, a higher share of workers in this state hold a certificate III or higher vocational qualification (30%) than those who have a bachelor degree or higher (28%).

The impact of COVID-19 on the South Australia labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in South Australia fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 47,400 or 5.5%).

Over the same period, 35,800 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 63.0% in March 2020, to 60.5% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded since July 2002. In addition, the unemployment rate rose, from 6.3% in March 2020, to 7.9% in May 2020, before peaking at 8.7% in June 2020, the highest rate recorded since January 1999.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases, and subsequent easing in restrictions, employment in South Australia increased by 66,400 between May 2020 and July 2021, and is now 19,000 or 2.2% above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 62.9% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 4.7% in July 2021.

Encouragingly, reflecting the relative absence of COVID-19 cases, there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in South Australia, as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements 1.6 times higher in July 2021 than their pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, South Australia

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Adelaide 668 39.4 6.3 35 48 15 20 32 28 34
Barossa - Yorke - Mid North 53.7 3.2 6.3 38 49 10 33 19 45 35
South Australia - Outback 39.4 -0.6 -1.5 32 48 15 25 5 42 44
South Australia - South East 86.9 -0.4 -0.5 38 46 17 26 14 36 39
South Australia 871.1 65.7 8.2 35 48 15 21 28 30 35
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Western Australia

Western Australia Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 09:54
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The West Australia graphic shows 22% of jobs are regional. 14% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 15% of workers are self-employed.
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32% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 31% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 6% of workers hold an other qualification. 31% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Western Australia

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 202.0 15 50.5 33.3
Education and Training 131.5 9 39.9 43.6
Construction 128.7 9 -5.5 -4.1
Retail Trade 123.8 9 -11.7 -8.7
Mining 120.0 9 12.7 11.9
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 105.6 8 10.8 11.4
Accommodation and Food Services 88.9 6 -1.2 -1.4
Manufacturing 84.9 6 1.2 1.4
Public Administration and Safety 84.8 6 0.9 1.0
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 75.7 5 12.6 19.9
Other Services 56.7 4 -1.6 -2.8
Administrative and Support Services 43.0 3 2.6 6.5
Wholesale Trade 33.3 2 -5.9 -15.2
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 31.2 2 -0.4 -1.3
Financial and Insurance Services 28.6 2 1.2 4.2
Arts and Recreation Services 26.5 2 -1.9 -6.8
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 20.5 1 3.5 20.5
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 18.1 1 -4.4 -19.7
Information Media and Telecommunications 8.7 1 -7.3 -45.9

Western Australia is the fourth largest employing state, with employment mostly located in Perth.

The largest employing industry in Western Australia is Health Care and Social Assistance. Demand for work in this industry is only going to increase given Australia’s ageing population. It is worth noting that not everyone employed in this industry is a doctor or a nurse.

Some of the top employing occupations in Health Care and Social Assistance include Receptionists, General Clerks, Kitchenhands and Commercial Cleaners. These are all occupations that can be perfect entry level positions and generally require minimal qualifications or prior experience.

Unlike the rest of Australia, a large proportion of Western Australians are employed in the Mining industry (around one in 10 workers). Reflecting this, around 45% of total Mining employment is in this state.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Western Australia labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in Western Australia fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 95,600 or 6.9%).

Over the same period, 67,300 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 68.2% in March 2020, to 65.0% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded since August 2004. In addition, the unemployment rate rose sharply, from 5.7% in March 2020, to 8.0% in May 2020, before peaking at 8.5% in June 2020, the highest rate recorded since June 1994.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases, and subsequent easing in restrictions, however, employment in Western Australia increased by 128,700 between May 2020 and July 2021 and is now 33,200 (or 2.4%) above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 68.5% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is now below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 4.6% in July 2021.

While the outbreak of COVID-19 across a number of Australian jurisdictions has increased the level of uncertainty across much of the country, it is encouraging to note that there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in Western Australia (reflecting the relative absence of COVID-19), as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements now 1.6 times higher in July 2021 than the pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, Western Australia

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Greater Perth 1087.5 44.4 4.3 34 47 14 19 35 28 30
Bunbury 91.8 -2.3 -2.4 33 46 19 20 21 42 35
Western Australia - Outback 114.9 -4.7 -3.9 25 43 9 20 29 40 28
Western Australia - Wheat Belt 70.9 10.1 16.6 37 45 9 32 16 39 40
Western Australia 1391.8 79.6 6.1 33 47 14 20 32 31 31
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Tasmania

Tasmania Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:17
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The Tasmania graphic shows 54% of jobs are regional. 15% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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28% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 33% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in Tasmania

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 41.6 16 7.2 21.1
Retail Trade 29.6 11 2.5 9.2
Accommodation and Food Services 25.3 10 7.3 40.7
Education and Training 21.5 8 0.4 2.0
Public Administration and Safety 19.8 8 2.1 12.0
Manufacturing 19.8 8 0.1 0.6
Construction 19.5 7 1.9 10.9
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 13.9 5 1.9 15.7
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 13.0 5 3.6 37.8
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 10.9 4 -1.7 -13.8
Other Services 9.9 4 0.8 8.6
Administrative and Support Services 8.4 3 1.3 18.8
Wholesale Trade 5.7 2 0.5 10.4
Arts and Recreation Services 5.1 2 0.3 5.7
Financial and Insurance Services 5.0 2 0.0 -0.7
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 4.1 2 -0.3 -6.2
Mining 3.1 1 0.3 11.9
Information Media and Telecommunications 3.0 1 -0.1 -3.6
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 2.5 1 -1.6 -38.5

While Tasmania is the smallest employing state, there are employment opportunities available across all industries.

Health Care and Social Assistance is the largest employing industry (accounting for 16% of the workforce), followed by Retail Trade and Accommodation and Food Services.

Tasmania has the oldest workforce of any state or territory, with 46% aged 45 years or older. Part-time work is also relatively common (39% of state employment, the largest share in Australia). Workers in this state are less likely than the national average to have a bachelor degree or higher, although they are more likely to have completed a certificate III or higher vocational qualification.

Tasmania has the most regionally diverse workforce in Australia, with more than half of all workers employed outside of Hobart.

The impact of COVID-19 on the Tasmania labour market

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in Tasmania fell sharply between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020 (down by 18,100 or 7.0%).

Over the same period, 15,400 people left the labour force, pushing the participation rate down, from 61.0% in March 2020, to 57.4% in May 2020, the lowest rate recorded since April 2002. In addition, the unemployment rate rose sharply, from 5.0% in March 2020, to 6.4% in May 2020, before peaking at 7.9% in October 2020, the highest rate recorded since September 2013.

Reflecting the decline in COVID-19 cases and subsequent easing in restrictions, however, employment in Tasmania rebounded strongly, increasing by 23,200 between May 2020 and July 2021, and is now 5,100 (or 2.0%) above its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the state increased to 61.3% in July 2021, while the unemployment rate is now below the rate recorded in March 2020, standing at 4.5% in July 2021.

While the outbreak of COVID-19 cases across a number of jurisdictions has increased the level of uncertainty across much of the country, it is encouraging to note that there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in Tasmania (reflecting its COVID-19 free status), as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements now 1.7 times higher in July 2021 than their pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, Tasmania

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Hobart 118.8 12.4 11.6 40 47 15 22 36 29 28
Launceston and North East 70.3 5.3 8.1 36 49 15 25 25 32 37
South East 17.7 1.5 9.3 43 47 10 33 24 38 29
West and North West 48.5 -3.1 -6.1 37 47 14 27 18 36 37
Tasmania 259 23.4 9.9 39 47 15 25 28 32 33
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Northern Territory

Northern Territory Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:25
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The Northern Territory graphic shows 37% of jobs are regional. 12% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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33% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 32% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in the Northern Territory

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Health Care and Social Assistance 22.1 17 4.8 27.9
Public Administration and Safety 22.0 17 -3.1 -12.2
Construction 12.3 9 -2.1 -14.6
Education and Training 10.8 8 0.8 8.0
Retail Trade 9.9 8 -1.2 -11.1
Accommodation and Food Services 9.9 8 -0.5 -4.6
Other Services 8.1 6 2.0 32.8
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 6.7 5 1.2 22.6
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 6.3 5 -1.7 -20.9
Administrative and Support Services 5.7 4 2.6 82.6
Mining 3.1 2 -4.8 -60.3
Arts and Recreation Services 3.0 2 -0.5 -13.4
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 3.0 2 1.8 -
Manufacturing 3.0 2 -0.8 -21.0
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 1.9 1 -0.2 -7.3
Wholesale Trade 1.6 1 -2.0 -56.5
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 1.4 1 -1.2 -46.1
Financial and Insurance Services 0.9 1 -0.6 -
Information Media and Telecommunications 0.7 1 0.1 -

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in the Northern Territory fell by 8,600 (or 6.4%) between March 2020 and September 2020. Over the same period, the participation rate in the territory decreased, from 75.6% in March 2020, to 70.5% in September 2020, while the unemployment rate rose, from 5.2% in March 2020, to a peak of 7.3% in July 2020.

Since September 2020, employment in the Northern Territory has increased by 2,600 but remains 6,100 (or 4.5%) below its pre-pandemic level. While the unemployment rate in the territory, at 4.6% in July 2021, is below the pre-pandemic rate, the participation rate is also below that recorded in March 2020, standing at 71.2%.

Encouragingly, reflecting the relative absence of COVID-19 cases, there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in the Northern Territory, as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements 1.5 times higher than the pre-pandemic level.

Employment by region, Northern Territory

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
Darwin 82.4 -3.8 -4.4 23 47 14 17 30 35 32
NT - Outback 47.7 -0.7 -1.5 26 48 10 22 49 21 29
Northern Territory 131 -6.5 -4.7 24 48 12 19 34 30 32
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Note: While September 2020 was the trough recorded in employment for the Northern Territory during the immediate aftermath of the pandemic, employment in the territory was at a lower level in June 2021. It should be noted that data for the Northern Territory contains a degree of volatility and should be interpreted with caution.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.

Australian Capital Territory

Australian Capital Territory Alexander Vilagosh Tue, 09/21/2021 - 10:30
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to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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49% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 21% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Top employing industries in the Australian Capital Territory

  Employ’t May 2021 Share of total 5 year change to May 2021
Industries  '000 %  '000 %
Public Administration and Safety 66.2 28 -1.2 -1.8
Health Care and Social Assistance 32.3 14 9.2 40.1
Professional, Scientific and Technical Services 30.1 13 6.4 26.8
Education and Training 19.4 8 4.6 31.2
Retail Trade 19.1 8 2.3 14.0
Construction 17.5 7 3.4 23.9
Accommodation and Food Services 13.9 6 0.9 7.3
Other Services 9.6 4 2.8 41.7
Administrative and Support Services 6.2 3 0.3 5.6
Transport, Postal and Warehousing 5.8 2 -1.5 -20.3
Arts and Recreation Services 5.6 2 1.0 22.7
Financial and Insurance Services 3.2 1 -2.4 -42.7
Manufacturing 3.0 1 -1.3 -29.8
Information Media and Telecommunications 2.9 1 0.0 -1.3
Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing 1.4 1 0.0 -
Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services 1.4 1 -1.8 -57.5
Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services 1.3 1 -0.7 -
Wholesale Trade 1.0 0.4 -0.7 -
Mining 0.2 0.1 0.1 -

Following the onset of COVID-19 and the shutdown of non-essential services and trading restrictions, employment in the ACT fell by 9,900 (or 4.2%) between March 2020 and the trough in May 2020. Over the same period, the participation rate in the ACT decreased, from 72.3% in March 2020, to 69.7% in May 2020, while the unemployment rate rose, from 3.2% in March 2020, to a peak of 4.8% in June 2020 in the immediate aftermath of the pandemic.

Employment in the ACT increased by 4,200 between May 2020 and July 2021 but remains 5,800 (or 2.4%) below its pre-pandemic level. Moreover, the participation rate in the territory, at 70.8% in July 2021, is below the rate recorded in March 2020, while the unemployment rate, at 4.3% in July 2021, is above the pre-pandemic rate.

Encouragingly, there has been robust growth in recruitment activity in the ACT, as measured by the Internet Vacancy Index, with job advertisements 1.2 times higher than the pre-pandemic level, although the recent outbreak of COVID-19 cases, and associated lockdown and restrictions, is likely to dampen labour market activity in the coming months.

Employment by region

  Employment Employment Profile Educational
  Employment May 2021 5 year change to May 2021 Part-time Female Aged 15 to 24 years Aged 55 years or older Bachelor degree or higher Cert III or higher VET qual No post-school qual
Region '000 '000 % % % % % % % %
ACT 237.2 18.7 8.5 27 50 15 16 49 21 27
Australia 13125.1 1177.9 9.9 32 47 14 20 36 29 29

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work; National Skills Commission, Internet Vacancy Index.