Jobs by Industry

Jobs by Industry Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:12
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This image displays the top five largest employing industries in Australia. Health Care and Social Assistance. This industry accounts for 14% of Australian workers. 78% are female and the top employing occupations are Registered Nurses, Aged and Disabled Carers and Child Carers.

Health Care and Social Assistance

Health Care and Social Assistance Alexander Vilagosh Mon, 09/20/2021 - 18:13
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This image shows 33% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 9% of workers are self-employed.
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51% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 15% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Health Care and Social Assistance is Australia’s largest employing industry and, given the COVID-19 pandemic, has a critically important workforce. It covers health services like hospitals, General Practitioners, dental and ambulance services, as well as child care and aged care.

Top employing occupations

Occupation This industry All industries
Registered Nurses 283,800 309,100
Aged and Disabled Carers 216,100 240,900
Receptionists 98,200 164,500
Child Carers 87,100 132,500
Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers 84,300 92,700
General Practitioners and Resident Medical Officers 66,900 70,200
Welfare Support Workers 38,900 72,800
General Clerks 36,400 311,200
Psychologists 27,500 31,900
Physiotherapists 27,500 34,800
Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses 25,700 26,200
Health and Welfare Services Managers 26,200 32,900
Medical Technicians 25,000 33,800
Social Workers 24,700 40,500
Kitchenhands 24,300 138,800
Midwives 23,400 25,900
Practice Managers 23,300 27,400
Dental Assistants 21,800 21,900
Nurse Managers 18,300 23,900
Welfare, Recreation and Community Arts Workers 21,500 33,800

This industry has a large proportion of part-time workers, with 45% of the workforce employed part-time (compared with the Australian average of 32%). There is also a significant share of female workers in Health Care and Social Assistance (nearly four in five workers are female).

Post-school education is commonly required in this industry with more than 80% of the workers having a post-school qualification. Qualifications are often mandatory for employment and training opportunities exist in both the higher education and VET sectors.

Demand is expected to continue for this industry, given the COVID-19 pandemic and Australia’s ageing population.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Education and Training

Education and Training Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:15
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This image shows 30% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 6% of workers are self-employed.
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69% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 18% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 10% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Education and Training is one of Australia’s largest employing industries, and includes teaching occupations across all levels of schools, as well as University Lecturers and Tutors. Around 72% of the workforce is female, the second highest percentage for any industry within Australia. Part-time work is also relatively common (around 40% of workers).

Top employing occupations

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Primary School Teachers 166,300 178,900
Secondary School Teachers 120,300 121,000
Education Aides 99,100 118,800
University Lecturers and Tutors 59,400 60,400
Private Tutors and Teachers 45,600 51,900
Child Carers 37,100 132,500
General Clerks 36,200 311,200
Vocational Education Teachers 29,600 38,000
Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers 27,900 51,100
Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials 25,600 62,700
School Principals 23,100 23,900
Special Education Teachers 17,200 17,800
Education Advisers and Reviewers 18,100 19,800
Commercial Cleaners 15,800 167,000
Other Education Managers 10,800 12,800
Office Managers 10,500 115,900
Counsellors 9,300 25,700
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 9,100 123,000
Receptionists 8,300 164,500
ICT Support Technicians 6,600 61,100

Most people who work in Education and Training have post-school qualifications, with more than two-thirds of workers holding a bachelor degree or higher (the highest of any industry). Reflecting the time taken to gain these qualifications, only 9% of this workforce is aged 15 to 24 years old. While most jobs need a university degree, lower skilled jobs like Education Aides can provide an employment pathway to enter the industry.

In addition, a relatively large share of workers is aged 55 years or older (23%), which suggests retirements will create employment opportunities in this industry over the next decade.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Construction

Construction Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:23
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This image shows 31% of jobs are regional. 15% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 35% of workers are self-employed.
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13% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 49% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 31% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Construction is one of Australia’s largest employing industries, with employment opportunities available at all skill and experience levels across the country. The most common entry into this industry is through the completion of an apprenticeship or traineeship, which is reflected in the workforce’s educational attainment (almost half of workers possess a certificate III or higher VET qualification).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Carpenters and Joiners 113,600 143,100
Electricians 109,600 175,900
Construction Managers 95,500 116,700
Plumbers 77,100 84,600
Building and Plumbing Labourers 48,400 63,200
Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians 40,300 78,200
Painting Trades Workers 39,400 44,400
Earthmoving Plant Operators 33,500 47,600
Concreters 28,000 31,500
Plasterers 22,100 22,500
Gardeners 26,700 83,000
Accounting Clerks 23,100 144,100
Handypersons 23,100 46,700
General Clerks 23,000 311,200
Civil Engineering Professionals 20,800 53,000
Wall and Floor Tilers 19,300 20,700
Bricklayers and Stonemasons 19,100 24,100
Office Managers 17,600 115,900
Truck Drivers 17,000 160,500
Insulation and Home Improvement Installers 16,000 22,600

Around one in three workers, though, do not possess any post-school qualifications and 15% of the workforce are Labourers, which suggests there are some good entry level opportunities. Around one in three employers may not formally advertise when recruiting. Rather, employers in the Construction industry may rely on word of mouth or more informal recruitment methods (such as advertising on social media).

This industry offers plenty of opportunities for self-employment, and more than one in three workers report being their own boss.

The Construction workforce is predominantly male and has the lowest percentage of female employment of any industry (14%).

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Manufacturing

Manufacturing Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:28
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This image shows 31% of jobs are regional. 11% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 13% of workers are self-employed.
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22% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 35% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 36% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Australia’s Manufacturing industry is a very diverse sector and covers the manufacture of food and beverages, petroleum and coal, polymer products, machinery, furniture and more. While it is common for workers to hold a certificate III or higher VET qualification, employers in this industry also value trade experience and practical knowledge. This is shown by the sizeable proportion of workers who do not have post-school qualifications (more than a third of the workforce).

While almost 100,000 young people are employed in Manufacturing, they represent a relatively small part of this industry (11% are aged 15 to 24 years old).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers 49,400 77,500
Production Managers 38,300 61,500
Packers 31,400 71,300
Metal Fitters and Machinists 30,400 106,000
Food and Drink Factory Workers 24,500 29,900
Cabinetmakers 23,100 25,700
Product Assemblers 19,600 22,200
Manufacturers 19,300 24,400
Sales Assistants (General) 19,000 586,200
Bakers and Pastrycooks 18,900 39,600
Storepersons 17,800 137,900
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 17,500 94,000
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 17,400 156,500
Forklift Drivers 16,900 61,400
Accounting Clerks 14,300 144,100
Sales Representatives 14,100 65,900
Engineering Production Workers 13,900 14,600
Meat, Poultry and Seafood Process Workers 13,400 17,100
Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers 12,500 41,400
Printers 10,600 12,900

Employment in this industry is typically full-time (83%). There are a range of job opportunities in the Manufacturing industry, across different levels of skill and experience. Most workers in the industry are employed as Technicians and Trades Workers (27%), Labourers (18%) or Managers (17%).

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:32
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This image shows 17% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 26% of workers are self-employed.
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63% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 20% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 3% of workers hold an other qualification. 14% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Professional, Scientific and Technical Services is a large and diverse industry and includes legal and accounting services, veterinary services, and computer system design. Employment is mostly located in capital cities and 65% of jobs are concentrated in New South Wales and Victoria.

This is a highly skilled workforce, with more than 80% holding post-school qualifications. Reflecting the time it takes to attain the required qualifications, a small share of this workforce is young (aged 15 to 24 years old). Workers in the industry are mostly employed as Professionals (62%).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Accountants 99,200 198,100
Software and Applications Programmers 91,600 150,700
Solicitors 68,800 96,600
Management and Organisation Analysts 44,200 101,500
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 40,700 88,900
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 35,000 156,500
ICT Support Technicians 33,300 61,100
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators 30,000 54,100
Bookkeepers 28,200 97,100
ICT Managers 27,600 84,400
Architects and Landscape Architects 27,200 46,400
General Clerks 27,100 311,200
Civil Engineering Professionals 25,900 53,000
Architectural, Building and Surveying Technicians 18,700 78,200
Database and Systems Administrators, and ICT Security Specialists 18,600 52,800
Computer Network Professionals 17,300 38,600
ICT Business and Systems Analysts 15,600 41,100
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 14,500 123,000
Conveyancers and Legal Executives 14,300 14,600
Office Managers 14,200 115,900

There are opportunities to work as your own boss within this industry, with more than a quarter of the workforce self-employed.

While dependent on the role they are performing, workers in this industry often have scope to work remotely. In December 2020, around half (49%) of the businesses in the Professional, Scientific and Technical Services industry still had staff working from home, compared with 16% across all industries.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Financial and Insurance Services

Financial and Insurance Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:40
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This image shows 13% of jobs are regional. 5% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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 57% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 20% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 19% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Employment in the Financial and Insurance Services industry includes banking, insurance and superannuation funds, as well as financial brokering services. Employment is concentrated primarily in capital cities, particularly along Australia’s east coast, with around 40% of the workforce located in New South Wales.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Bank Workers 42,700 44,800
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers 42,000 52,100
Financial Brokers 31,300 32,800
Insurance, Money Market and Statistical Clerks 28,600 30,700
Credit and Loans Officers 28,200 31,000
Accountants 20,100 198,100
Software and Applications Programmers 16,900 150,700
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 15,500 156,500
Financial Dealers 14,600 17,800
Insurance Agents 14,000 15,800
Finance Managers 13,700 68,700
General Clerks 12,600 311,200
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 12,600 76,800
Management and Organisation Analysts 12,500 101,500
Auditors, Company Secretaries and Corporate Treasurers 10,600 32,800
Information Officers 9,300 88,300
ICT Managers 7,600 84,400
Other Information and Organisation Professionals 7,200 49,000
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 7,200 123,000
Call or Contact Centre Workers 7,200 33,600

This workforce is highly qualified, with 77% holding post-school qualifications (compared with 65% across all industries). Almost all jobs are for Professionals, Clerical and Administrative Workers and Managers.

Reflecting the time it takes to attain the required qualifications, a small share of this workforce is aged 15 to 24 years old (just 5%). That said, Bank Workers is the largest employing occupation within Financial and Insurance Services and this role generally does not require post-school qualifications and can provide a pathway into the industry. 

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Retail Trade

Retail Trade Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:44
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This image shows 33% of jobs are regional. 32% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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21% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 24% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 50% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Retail Trade was one of the industries most severely affected by COVID-19, however, employment in the industry has rebounded strongly. Across 2020, 21% of businesses in this industry reported that COVID-19 had a positive impact on their business, likely driven by increased sales volume at grocery stores and for home office equipment such as electronics and furniture. Retail Trade remains Australia’s second largest employing industry.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
General Sales Assistants 389,800 586,200
Retail Managers 153,200 262,500
Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers 118,600 142,100
Shelf Fillers 62,800 65,000
Storepersons 36,800 137,900
Pharmacy Sales Assistants 36,100 38,200
Retail Supervisors 33,600 44,400
Pharmacists 28,600 42,600
Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons 24,700 27,800
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 18,200 94,000
Butchers and Smallgoods Makers 16,100 20,700
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 15,200 156,500
Sales Representatives 14,900 65,900
General Clerks 12,600 311,200
Motor Mechanics 12,600 106,600
Service Station Attendants 9,100 9,600
Accounting Clerks 10,600 144,100
Packers 9,900 71,300
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 9,800 88,900
Delivery Drivers 9,700 74,900

Retail employs more young people than most other industries. This is because entry level roles within the industry generally do not require prior experience or qualifications, with half the workers having no post-school qualifications. Many occupations in the industry can also provide flexible hours, allowing work around school and other commitments.

It is important to remember that jobs in this industry might not always be formally advertised. When looking for work in Retail Trade remember to ask friends, family and any other contacts if they are aware of any job opportunities. Opportunities might be available by word-of-mouth, or via signs in shop windows and through social media.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Wholesale Trade

Wholesale Trade Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 13:51
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This image shows 26% of jobs are regional. 8% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 14% of workers are self-employed.
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27% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 30% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 38% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Wholesalers do not usually have a shop front to sell their items; they are the middle step between producers and retailers. It is one of the smaller employing industries, with employment mainly located in the capital cities along Australia’s east coast.

While close to 40% of this workforce does not have post-school qualifications, only a small share of this industry are younger workers (8% are aged 15 to 24 years).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Storepersons 28,600 137,900
Importers, Exporters and Wholesalers 20,800 25,800
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 20,700 94,000
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 20,400 156,500
General Sales Assistants 19,500 586,200
Sales Representatives 17,700 65,900
Retail Managers 14,200 262,500
Technical Sales Representatives 12,500 23,500
General Clerks 10,900 311,200
Forklift Drivers 9,500 61,400
Accounting Clerks 9,300 144,100
Truck Drivers 9,000 160,500
Delivery Drivers 8,200 74,900
Metal Fitters and Machinists 7,100 106,000
Office Managers 6,800 115,900
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers 6,600 41,800
Accountants 5,500 198,100
Packers 5,100 71,300
Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons 4,500 27,800
Production Managers 4,100 61,500

From June to December 2020, Wholesale Trade showed the lowest level of recruitment by any industry with just 27% of employers stating they were or had recruited in the past month. Around one in five employers in this industry also don’t advertise their vacancies, instead relying on word-of-mouth or recruiting job seekers who approach their business. Although entry level opportunities exist in every industry, positions in Wholesale Trade may be better suited to older job seekers who possess the practical experience employers seek and have the connections to find work in this industry.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Mining

Mining Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:21
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This image shows 51% of jobs are regional. 6% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 1% of workers are self-employed.
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25% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 43% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Mining is an important industry in terms of its export revenue, but it is a relatively small employing industry (accounting for around 2% of Australian jobs). Employment is largely concentrated in Western Australia and Queensland, and the majority of jobs are located in regional areas. Exploration is a large component of the industry, with Western Australia currently being the major location for minerals exploration.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Drillers, Miners and Shot Firers 47,500 57,100
Metal Fitters and Machinists 25,800 106,000
Other Building and Engineering Technicians 17,100 35,100
Electricians 11,100 175,900
Mining Engineers 9,400 15,400
Production Managers 9,300 61,500
Truck Drivers 9,200 160,500
Earthmoving Plant Operators 6,500 47,600
Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers 6,400 77,500
Other Construction and Mining Labourers 5,100 7,400
Geologists, Geophysicists and Hydrogeologists 4,800 13,000
Industrial, Mechanical and Production Engineers 4,600 41,400
Accountants 4,200 198,100
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 3,900 123,000
General Clerks 3,600 311,200
Engineering Managers 3,400 27,700
Chemical, Gas, Petroleum and Power Generation Plant Operators 3,100 10,600
Occupational and Environmental Health Professionals 2,700 27,200
Structural Steel Construction Workers 2,700 22,600
Office Managers 2,500 115,900

Western Australia also has more than 300 mining and petroleum projects in operation, which produce more than 50 commodities for the global market.

Workers are often expected to travel for work, with fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) arrangements relatively common.

Post-school qualifications are often required to work in Mining. Around 43% of workers hold a certificate III or higher vocational qualification, and 25% possess a bachelor degree or higher. Almost a third of workers are Technicians and Trades Workers, 29% are Machinery Operators and Drivers, and 17% are Professionals.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:25
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This image shows 81% of jobs are regional. 9% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 55% of workers are self-employed.
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14% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 28% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 10% of workers hold an other qualification. 48% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing is an industry largely made up of workers employed in agribusiness. Most are farmers, living in regional Australia and managing their own properties. This is reflected in the high level of self-employment (around one in two workers, the highest percentage of any industry). Around 43% of workers are aged 55 years or older (again, the highest of any industry).

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Livestock Farmers 87,100 90,600
Crop Farmers 40,600 40,800
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmers 27,200 28,000
Crop Farm Workers 22,400 24,900
Livestock Farm Workers 24,600 27,200
Agricultural, Forestry and Horticultural Plant Operators 10,700 12,500
Bookkeepers 7,800 97,100
Packers 4,900 71,300
Garden and Nursery Labourers 4,900 35,500
Mixed Crop and Livestock Farm Workers 1,300 1,300
Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers 4,000 12,200
General Clerks 4,000 311,200
Agricultural and Forestry Scientists 3,600 6,500
Deck and Fishing Hands 2,700 5,400
Truck Drivers 2,400 160,500
Accounting Clerks 2,200 144,100
Retail Managers 2,100 262,500
Animal Attendants and Trainers 1,800 21,500
Office Managers 1,800 115,900

The need for formal qualifications is less common, with around half of this workforce having no post-school qualifications. Instead, practical skills and experience are more highly valued, with many of these skills being learnt on the job. Formal qualifications, though, can be gained through the VET sector which also contributes to this industry’s skills. It is important to note, however, that technologically advanced production systems (i.e. farm automation, artificial intelligence) are becoming more common and the employers who use such systems will require more highly skilled workers.

When looking for work in this industry, seasonal work such as fruit picking is fairly common and may present short-term opportunities for job seekers of all ages.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Accommodation and Food Services

Accommodation and Food Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:27
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This image shows 35% of jobs are regional. 45% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 11% of workers are self-employed.
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15% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 24% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 57% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Accommodation and Food Services provides many opportunities for young people looking for their first job, or for mature aged workers looking to re-enter the workforce. Most entry level roles within this industry generally do not need prior experience or qualifications, with more than half of workers having no post-school qualifications. Many occupations also provide flexible hours (around 62% of workers are employed part-time), allowing work around school and other commitments.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Waiters 109,000 131,700
Kitchenhands 90,800 138,800
Bar Attendants and Baristas 86,300 103,400
General Sales Assistants 75,500 586,200
Chefs 72,600 91,200
Cafe and Restaurant Managers 54,400 65,500
Fast Food Cooks 43,600 44,500
Retail Managers 30,200 262,500
Cafe Workers 28,700 33,100
Cooks 25,000 43,600
Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers 21,000 142,100
Hotel and Motel Managers 18,900 24,700
Commercial Cleaners 16,200 167,000
Receptionists 12,400 164,500
Housekeepers 11,900 28,100
Delivery Drivers 11,100 74,900
Hotel Service Managers 6,400 9,500
Vending Machine Attendants 4,500 6,800
Bakers and Pastrycooks 4,500 39,600
Handypersons 4,200 46,700

Employment in Accommodation and Food Services has rebounded from COVID-19 lows, and the industry continues to provide many jobs. There are employment opportunities within this industry across most occupation groups, and in all states and territories. If you are seeking work in Accommodation and Food Services, consider looking online as 36% of employers in the industry use social media when recruiting.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Arts and Recreation Services

Arts and Recreation Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:35
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This image shows 29% of jobs are regional. 25% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 20% of workers are self-employed.
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38% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 27% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 5% of workers hold an other qualification. 30% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Arts and Recreation Services has a relatively young workforce (25% are aged 15 to 24 years), with most commonly employed as Community and Personal Service Workers (27% of employment) or Professionals (25%).

This is a relatively small employing industry, accounting for around 2% of Australian jobs. There are, though, opportunities for flexible work, with one in five workers self-employed, and almost half employed part-time.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Sports Coaches, Instructors and Officials 18,900 62,700
Fitness Instructors 11,700 38,900
Amusement, Fitness and Sports Centre Managers 10,200 16,200
Music Professionals 7,400 13,000
Sportspersons 7,300 8,600
Visual Arts and Crafts Professionals 6,600 12,500
Receptionists 6,600 164,500
Gaming Workers 6,400 9,300
Gardeners 6,100 83,000
Greenkeepers 6,100 12,800
Other Specialist Managers 5,700 52,200
Actors, Dancers and Other Entertainers 5,400 8,400
Authors, and Book and Script Editors 4,700 9,400
Animal Attendants and Trainers 4,500 21,500
Sales Assistants (General) 4,100 586,200
Bar Attendants and Baristas 4,100 103,400
Journalists and Other Writers 3,900 27,900
Commercial Cleaners 3,700 167,000
General Clerks 3,500 311,200
Livestock Farm Workers 3,500 27,200

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant negative impact on employment in Arts and Recreation Services, however, the industry has rebounded strongly. While some organisations have been gradually reopening and transitioning to new ways of working, businesses in some parts of the country remain on hold.

Through the COVID-19 pandemic, some businesses transitioned to new ways of working (for example, delivering fitness classes via online video conferencing, live streaming or video on demand). These new ways of working could create long term changes to the way organisations in this industry operate.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Transport, Postal and Warehousing

Transport, Postal and Warehousing Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:40
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This image shows 26% of jobs are regional. 8% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 21% of workers are self-employed.
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21% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 27% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 45% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Transport, Postal and Warehousing is a diverse industry that revolves around the movement of people and goods by road, rail or air. Postal and courier services, warehousing and storage are also included.

While qualifications are generally not needed for occupations in this industry (almost half of the workers do not have post-school qualifications), licences and tickets may be required. Examples include a forklift licence, truck/heavy vehicle licence, construction white card and 'working at heights' ticket.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Truck Drivers 109,100 160,500
Automobile Drivers 47,700 48,600
Storepersons 39,600 137,900
Bus and Coach Drivers 38,100 47,900
Couriers and Postal Deliverers 36,700 47,300
Delivery Drivers 33,800 74,900
Forklift Drivers 23,200 61,400
Transport and Despatch Clerks 21,300 35,500
Supply, Distribution and Procurement Managers 17,000 41,800
Train and Tram Drivers 10,000 11,100
Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks 12,300 94,000
Mail Sorters 10,700 15,300
Sales Assistants (General) 10,400 586,200
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 9,400 70,500
General Clerks 9,300 311,200
Transport Services Managers 9,000 14,300
Freight and Furniture Handlers 8,500 15,100
Air Transport Professionals 8,000 9,100
Accounting Clerks 7,800 144,100
Motor Mechanics 7,400 106,600

Around one in five workers are either self-employed or work part-time, suggesting that there are options for contract work or flexible hours. This includes Bus and Coach Drivers, Delivery Drivers and Truck Drivers. There are also job opportunities with around 60% of employers recruiting in this industry stating they had difficulty filling their vacancies from August to December 2020.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 14:47
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This image shows 34% of jobs are regional. 7% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 7% of workers are self-employed.
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35% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 39% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 22% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services is a relatively small employing industry, accounting for around 1% of Australian jobs. This industry covers electricity supply, generation, transmission and distribution, gas supply, water supply as well as sewerage and waste disposal.

The electricity supply sector is responsible for the generation of electricity as well as its transmission and distribution. It is also responsible for arranging the sale of electricity via power distribution systems operated by others. With around 90% of national energy currently coming from the burning of fossil fuels, employment opportunities will exist moving forward as the industry identifies ways which will allow Australians to produce more of its electricity from renewable sources.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Truck Drivers 10,600 160,500
Electricians 8,300 175,900
Electrical Engineers 6,000 29,100
Electrical Distribution Trades Workers 5,500 5,600
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 4,100 123,000
Building and Plumbing Labourers 3,400 63,200
Other Specialist Managers 3,300 52,200
Plumbers 3,300 84,600
Other Stationary Plant Operators 3,200 20,100
Chemical, Gas, Petroleum and Power Generation Plant Operators 3,200 10,600
Metal Fitters and Machinists 3,200 106,000
Other Factory Process Workers 2,900 14,800
ICT Managers 2,800 84,400
General Clerks 2,800 311,200
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 2,400 156,500
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 2,400 76,800
Other Building and Engineering Technicians 2,300 35,100
Information Officers 2,300 88,300
Office Managers 2,200 115,900
Software and Applications Programmers 2,200 150,700

This industry has a highly skilled workforce, with nearly three quarters of the workforce having a post-school qualification (78%). The VET sector is the main training pathway and entry into this industry is predominantly though the completion of an apprenticeship or traineeship.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Administrative and Support Services

Administrative and Support Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:09
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This image shows 29% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 30% of workers are self-employed.
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26% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 29% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 38% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Administrative and Support Services is a small but essential industry which covers many services including office administration, debt collection, call centres, travel agencies, building cleaning, pest control and gardening services. Given the top two employing occupations in this industry are cleaner roles, demand for these services is likely to be maintained as businesses increase both the frequency and rigorousness of their cleaning schedules in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Commercial Cleaners 84,700 167,000
Gardeners 31,700 83,000
Domestic Cleaners 27,900 39,500
Human Resource Professionals 26,200 80,400
Tourism and Travel Advisers 11,000 12,600
General Clerks 12,200 311,200
Garden and Nursery Labourers 11,100 35,500
Packers 9,500 71,300
Conference and Event Organisers 9,400 28,700
Human Resource Managers 7,900 72,000
Call or Contact Centre Workers 7,400 33,600
Handypersons 7,400 46,700
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 7,000 76,800
Other Cleaners 6,800 10,500
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 6,200 156,500
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 5,700 70,500
Other Farm, Forestry and Garden Workers 5,500 12,200
Housekeepers 5,000 28,100
Accounting Clerks 4,600 144,100
Information Officers 4,400 88,300

This industry provides good part-time employment opportunities, with 43% of the workforce employed in this manner. Many jobs also do not need post-school qualifications, although some practical experience may be highly regarded by employers. Jobs like cleaning and gardening can be physically demanding and may not be suited to all job seekers.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Public Administration and Safety

Public Administration and Safety Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:13
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This image shows 30% of jobs are regional. 5% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 2% of workers are self-employed.
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44% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 29% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 23% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

Public Administration and Safety includes federal, state and local government administration and services like the police force. It has been one of the few industries to experience growth during the COVID-19 pandemic. The increase in workers is potentially due to the development and implementation of support programs as part of the Australian Government’s COVID-19 economic response, or equivalent state and territory government initiatives.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
General Clerks 75,200 311,200
Police 67,800 70,900
Security Officers and Guards 40,400 52,500
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 35,700 123,000
Intelligence and Policy Analysts 25,600 34,400
Inspectors and Regulatory Officers 24,400 33,600
Prison Officers 20,300 20,400
Information Officers 18,500 88,300
Other Miscellaneous Labourers 17,800 70,500
Policy and Planning Managers 16,200 33,000
Fire and Emergency Workers 15,800 20,300
Welfare Support Workers 14,300 72,800
Other Information and Organisation Professionals 13,400 49,000
Office Managers 13,400 115,900
Accounting Clerks 12,300 144,100
Human Resource Managers 12,100 72,000
Accountants 11,900 198,100
Urban and Regional Planners 11,500 19,500
Welfare, Recreation and Community Arts Workers 10,800 33,800
Human Resource Professionals 9,600 80,400

This workforce is relatively skilled (around three quarters of workers hold post-school qualifications), relatively old (just 5% are aged 15 to 24 years) and full-time work is common (83% of employment). Given this, there are fewer opportunities for entry level positions within this industry. All federal government departments, though, offer graduate programs for university graduates interested in a career in the Australian Public Service.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Information Media and Telecommunications

Information Media and Telecommunications Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:16
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This image 16% of jobs are regional. 10% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 17% of workers are self-employed.
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53% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 25% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 4% of workers hold an other qualification. 18% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

While Information Media and Telecommunications is a relatively small industry (representing around 1% of employment within Australia), it has a diverse profile and includes businesses such as newspaper and internet publishers, television and radio broadcasting, and telecommunications infrastructure and networks. Employment is mainly located in Sydney and Melbourne, but around one in six jobs are in regional Australia.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Telecommunications Trades Workers 13,300 15,000
Film, Television, Radio and Stage Directors 13,100 18,300
Journalists and Other Writers 12,400 27,900
Telecommunications Engineering Professionals 8,300 14,400
Librarians 7,600 15,400
Artistic Directors, and Media Producers and Presenters 7,600 12,900
ICT Managers 6,800 84,400
Software and Applications Programmers 6,100 150,700
Performing Arts Technicians 5,100 17,000
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 5,000 156,500
Gallery, Library and Museum Technicians 4,600 9,100
ICT Sales Assistants 4,100 16,300
General Managers 3,700 76,900
Graphic and Web Designers, and Illustrators 3,700 54,100
Sales Assistants (General) 3,100 586,200
Library Assistants 3,100 6,500
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 3,000 123,000
Sales Representatives 3,000 65,900
Advertising and Marketing Professionals 3,000 88,900
Accountants 2,700 198,100

It is a highly skilled workforce, with more than three quarters having a post-school qualification.

While qualifications are generally mandatory for the more technical roles, employers in some sectors of the industry (for example, publishing and broadcasting) may also see value if you can demonstrate your ability by showcasing a portfolio. Employers value prior experience and a portfolio is a good way to present evidence of your relevant skills and abilities.

Workers in this industry are typically interested in journalism, creative and technical writing, photography, video and music production and backstage production services, as well as computer programming, engineering and related technical and electronic support.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services

Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services Alexander Vilagosh Wed, 09/22/2021 - 15:18
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This image 26% of jobs are regional. 8% of workers are aged 15 to 24 years. 28% of workers are self-employed.
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34% of workers hold a bachelor degree or higher. 32% of workers hold a certificate 3 or higher qualification. 7% of workers hold an other qualification. 27% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification.

 

Annual Employment Growth (%)

While Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services is a relatively small industry, it has shown some growth over the past few years. Almost 42% of the workforce are Sales Workers, with Real Estate Sales Agents accounting for most of these.

Top employing occupations This industry All industries
Real Estate Sales Agents 79,800 95,200
General Clerks 10,700 311,200
Other Hospitality, Retail and Service Managers 8,900 76,800
Land Economists and Valuers 8,100 10,500
Office Managers 6,000 115,900
Advertising, Public Relations and Sales Managers 5,500 156,500
Accounting Clerks 5,300 144,100
Other Sales Assistants and Salespersons 4,700 15,900
Accountants 4,100 198,100
Receptionists 4,000 164,500
Bookkeepers 3,000 97,100
Personal Assistants 2,700 50,600
Contract, Program and Project Administrators 2,500 123,000
Metal Fitters and Machinists 2,400 106,000
Construction Managers 2,300 116,700
Commercial Cleaners 2,100 167,000
Handypersons 1,800 46,700
Motor Mechanics 1,700 106,600
Financial Investment Advisers and Managers 1,600 52,100
Secretaries 1,600 29,400

In response to the economic impact of COVID-19, many businesses across all industries accelerated adoption of new technologies (working from home, video conferencing etc). Businesses within Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services are the most likely to have introduced new technologies into their workplaces (51%), likely driven by new leasing and inspection procedures.

Workers in this industry generally have a broad range of qualifications, indicating that employment opportunities exist for people of all skill levels and qualifications. Work is commonly full-time (74%) and employment is evenly split along gender lines.

Sources: ABS, Labour Force (seasonally adjusted and annual averages of original data); ABS, Characteristics of Employment; ABS, Education and Work.