2.2: Matching skills and jobs β€” an introduction to JEDI

2.2: Matching skills and jobs β€” an introduction to JEDI Suzanne Cooper Thu, 06/25/2020 - 15:37

JEDI is a flagship NSC project that will deliver intelligence on skills needs.

By harnessing the best and widest range of labour market, skills and education data available, JEDI can identify what skills from

a person’s current or previous employment can transfer to different jobs that use similar skills. It also identifies skill gaps between the different jobs recommended before showing VET courses available to fill the gap.

Using data science, JEDI is pioneering a new approach to skills-based labour market analysis that is helping:

  • people planning their career and exploring study options
  • businesses looking at their workforce plan
  • training providers designing courses.

JEDI also provides a single comprehensive source of up-to-date information enabling the NSC to provide relevant, timely and accessible information to better understand the needs of a changing economy.

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Man in mask cleaning the inside of a lift

Building skills profiles with the Australian Skills Classification

As part of the JEDI project, the NSC (and its forerunners in the Department) has developed a data-driven Australian Skills Classification. It enables exploration of the connections and transferability within, and between, jobs and qualifications.

So far, around 600 skills profiles have been developed for occupations in the Australian labour market. For each of these jobs, the classification presents core competencies, specialised tasks and technology tools.

Figure 1: The make-up of skills profiles

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Source: NSC analysis

Source: NSC analysis

Figure 1

The figure displays the three components of a skills profile. Core competencies (which underpins all jobs), specialised tasks (detail the work activities for a job) and Technology tools (associated with a job). They are displayed in a circle which flows together.

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So far, around 600 skills profiles have been developed for occupations in the Australian labour market.